Wednesday, June 7, 2006

Letters to the Editor

From the Miami Herald about gay marriage.

First, one with tongue firmly planted in cheek:

I am as liberal as they come, but now that President Bush has announced his unqualified support for a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage, I, too, will support it.

Why? My happily married son and daughter-in-law have told me that each time they hear of a gay couple marrying, they feel a grave threat to their own marriage. In fact if this amendment does not pass, they say that they will have to divorce in order to protect the sanctity of their marriage. A threat as grave as gay marriage deserves no less than a constitutional amendment.

MARTIN BEST, Boca Raton

Then one completely clueless:

I have been dismayed that the courts imposed gay marriage in my state. Massachusetts should have followed the example of Vermont, which chose gay civil unions with full rights as the best solution.

The real problem with gay marriage is the message that it conveys to young kids. If we support gay marriage, then surely we also support gay dating. As our kids develop through childhood into adolescence, we’ll be endorsing and promoting ”loving relationships” with their same-sex peers, with all that this implies.

There is nothing sacred about the U.S. Constitution. Amending it is just a process. As we know from the example of Prohibition, an amendment can always be rescinded. If senators give a damn about our kids, they need to support the amendment that would define marriage as a union between a man and a woman.

JOHN FOUNTAIN, Needham, Mass.

Actually, Mr. Fountain, if adolescents learn that it is okay to date same-sex peers with all the social customs and mores that go with growing up, perhaps it might be a lot easier for them. Being a teenager is tough enough, and take it from one who has been there and done that, being a closeted gay teenager is a hell of a lot worse.

If you think there is “nothing sacred” about the U.S. Constitution, I really don’t want people like you telling the Senate what rights people do and don’t have.