Thursday, August 28, 2014

Happy Birthday Phil and Steve

To my dad and his twin.

099

Sailing.
Digging.
Hunting.
Shard-picking.
Swallows and Amazons.
The Wind in the Willows.
Animal jokes.
Lake Harriet.
The cuckoo clock.
Red or green?
red/green.
Boston.
The Cape.
Minneapolis.
Bandelier.
Lake Charlevoix.
“Find the bottom.”
Postscript.
The Navy.
Princeton.
Yale.
Michigan.
Harvard.
O-I.
Four kids.
Two sons.
My life.

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Stratford Memories

In years past, today would be the day we packed up the car and headed for Stratford, Ontario.  Then we’d have four days of theatre and touring around to see our friends at Jonny’s Antiques, Rundles restaurant, and Callan Books.  But the move to Cincinnati and the inexorable passing of time have made the trip now a wonderful memory.  And while we’re not going this year, we knew that our trip last year was our farewell tour, and we made the most of it.

So I’m not going to get all maudlin about it.  We have over fifty years of memories, stories, and pictures to share, and as long as we have them, we’re there.

14. Festival Theatre

The Festival Theatre.

3 Garden

The Shakespeare Garden in front of the Festival Theatre.

010 Callan Books

Callan Books — now closed — but once the best little bookshop in Canada.

012 Me

Some random theatre goer and erstwhile drama critic having a picnic along the banks of the Avon River.

003

Dad and Mom outside Fanfare Books. Thanks for taking me and forging the love of theatre.

008 The Avon

The Avon River that wends its way through Stratford

It was in Stratford that I truly fell in love with theatre, and from there I took that love and turned it into my life study, if not my profession.

It’s not goodbye; it’s just intermission.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Household Chore

Where to hang the family photos?

001

These used to hang in the upstairs hall of my parent’s house. They go back at least 50 years, and the one in the upper right is closer to 60 because my younger brother, born in 1956, isn’t in it.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Campaign Souvenir

My aunt, whose father was a business associate of Joseph P. Kennedy, gave me this PT-109 tie clip many years ago.  It was one of the campaign souvenirs handed out when John F. Kennedy ran for president in 1960, and she knew of my fondness for the late president.  I wear it every time I wear a tie.

For those of you who are too young to remember, PT-109 was the boat JFK captained while in the Pacific in World War II.  It was cut in half by a Japanese destroyer and he helped rescue his crew.  The incident served to secure war hero status for the future president and was made into a movie starring Cliff Robertson.

008

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Goodbye, Perrysburg

Commodore Perry

Commodore Perry

I’m writing this from the sun porch of my parents’ house in Perrysburg, Ohio.  It’s getting on towards late afternoon, but the sun is still high in the August sky, the sky is clear, the leaves on all the trees are that deep green that you see when they know they only have about a month or so before the light begins to change and the air cools in the evening.  The trees have to store up as much energy as they can to get through the long, grey winter ahead.

This sun porch is a familiar spot for me.  Most of my visits to this house have been in summer, and here is where we have our breakfast over the morning papers, afternoons on the couch with Tiger baseball on the TV, and dinner in the deepening twilight that lasts in summer until long after sunset and the rhythmic chorus of cicadas, katy-dids, and other denizens of the evening compete with the traffic on the street and the trains on the C&O railroad a few blocks over.

This is not the house I grew up in; Mom and Dad moved here in 1997 after living in northern Michigan for a while, but countless evenings were spent on the back porch of another house down the street where the same sounds filtered over the voice of Ernie Harwell calling the Tigers’ games on the crackling AM of WJR 760, the static telling us that somewhere, a thunderstorm was bringing rain and cool air to the cornfields that surround this small town.  Lightning bugs danced and glowed down at the bottom of the yard among the yew bushes and rhododendrons, and minty iced tea — and later, Stroh’s beer — made the evening cooler.

Summer, as you might have guessed, was my favorite time of year here, and even with our three weeks up in Michigan on the shores of Grand Traverse Bay, nothing said summer to me more than those evenings on the porch with the orchestration of light, shadow and sound and the scent of newly-mowed grass and drying alfalfa from the grain elevator across town.

But if things go as planned, this is my last night on this sun porch in Perrysburg.  Later this fall my parents will begin a new adventure in a new place far removed from this little town that has been our hometown since 1957.  It is all good for them, and all of us — my three siblings — are with them every step of the way.  They are healthy, happy, and in good spirits as they forge on ahead as they have done with so many adventures in their sixty-five years together.  And as I sit here in the peaceful afternoon, watching a hummingbird busily sip from the feeder, I know that letting go and moving on is a good thing.  I should know; I’ve done it more times than I can count, and have the license plates to prove it.

In the many times I’ve moved and in the many places I’ve lived, I have never let go of the feeling that this town of Perrysburg will always be my home town.  I know the streets and side streets better than any other place I’ve lived, thanks to the bike rides with my childhood friends Joe and Randy and Deke and Trip and Cynny and Scott and Jim and Tommy and Marvin.  I still call the stores on Louisiana Avenue by the names I knew them then: Houck’s Drugstore, Mills Hardware, The Sport Shop, Mrs. Piatt’s Bakery, Ken’s Barber Shop, and Norm’s Appliance.  That’s where we sat at the soda fountain and read Archie comics; that’s where we bought paint and nails; that’s where Dad bought his duck decoys and shotgun shells; that’s where the smell of bread crossed the street and birthday cakes came the way you dreamed they did; that’s where a haircut cost a dollar; and that’s the place where you lined up between the Norge refrigerators and GE air conditioners to get your driver’s license and license plates because the wife of Norm at the appliance store was the Deputy Registrar for the DMV.  It’s where I got my first driver’s license in 1968, typed out on a green piece of paper from a battered Smith-Corona.  The stores have all changed their names and sell different things — and Mills is closed, the windows papered over — but they’re still there.

The tennis courts, the swimming pool, the elementary school where I attended kindergarten, the grocery store, the railroad tracks; they’re as familiar as old books on the shelf that you take down and thumb through, remembering the stories they told.  The sidewalks still have the same cracks in them, the street signs may be new but the names like Hickory, Elm, Front and Second are still where friends and family lived, and the new car in the driveway is the successor to the Country Squire and Pontiac Bonneville that once parked there, the keys in the ignition, the doors unlocked.

I made sure that as I drove around town on the way to do errands with my parents I took notice of the town.  It has changed over the last fifty-six years, but not so much that I don’t recognize it by the sights, sounds, and sense of place that comes with having something become a part of you over a lifetime.  And I made sure that I said goodbye with a smile and a nod to old familiar places, echoes of laughter, memories of sadness and passings, and knowing that while Thomas Wolfe gets all the press for saying you can’t go home again, you can visit, even if the place you lived in belongs to someone else and the people you know have moved on.

They’re still there.  And so am I.

Our house from 1957 to 1982.

Our house from 1957 to 1982.

Sunday, June 16, 2013

Sixty-Five Years

June 16, 1948 was a Wednesday.  It was a pleasant day in St. Louis, Missouri; the high was about 78 with a little haze left over from the morning fog along the river.  It was a nice day for a wedding.

The young bride and groom came to the Church of St. Michael and St. George on Wydown Boulevard for the ceremony, with the two families and close friends gathering.  The bride’s younger sister was the maid of honor and the groom’s twin brother was his best man.  After the brief Episcopalian service, the bridal party went to the bride’s parents home for a small reception, and then the newlyweds left on their wedding trip to Chicago, staying at the Blackstone Hotel.  Then they went on to their new home in Princeton where he was finishing up his studies before moving on to Houston, Texas, where he would take up a job in the bag business.

The first child, a daughter, arrived the following year, followed the next year by a son.  Then, after moving on to Dallas, a third child, the second son, arrived in 1952.  Shortly thereafter they moved again, this time back to St. Louis, where in 1956 the fourth and last child, another son, completed the family.

Then in 1957 the family moved again, this time to Perrysburg, Ohio, and there they stayed, the kids growing up in a big house with a big yard, lots of friends and things to do, and the usual joys and sorrows, triumphs and tragedies, that come along with any family.  Dogs, cats, birds, bikes, camp, school, Little League, dancing school, tennis lessons, swim meets, all of the cacophony and organized chaos that fits in the wayback of the Ford Country Squire for trips to the lake and the ski slopes.

All too soon came the departures: college, weddings, new worlds for the kids to explore, new lives to lead, but always knowing they had a place to come home to, a phone number — TRinity 4-7824 — to call.  Over the years there have been bright days and dark nights.  There have been additions and losses, pain and laughter.  After all, it has been life.  And through it all Mom and Dad were there for us and for themselves.

Trying to put into words what a child feels when reflecting on the lives of the people who brought him to this world is not easy.  And knowing that among many of my friends, the simple fact that both of my parents are still alive and well is a rare blessing.  So I will make it very simple: on the sixty-fifth anniversary of the beginning of the journey that has brought me and my sister and brothers to life, I say thank you and I love you.

Nancy and Phil 2011

Friday, May 10, 2013

Welcome to Perrysburg

Here I am, in the welcoming arms of my parents and my home town for the weekend.

DSCN0444

This is the house I grew up in. Our family moved into it in June 1957 when I was four years old.  My parents sold it in 1982, moved to northern Michigan, and then moved back in 1997 to another place up the road from here. Now they’re on the verge of moving again, and I’m back home to help with some decisions about what to do with some of the things I grew up with. It is nostalgic, poignant, but also uplifting because it is a looking-forward time and sharing of memories.

By my count, I’ve lived in about twenty different places since I went off to college in 1971, and I wasn’t born here, but Perrysburg, Ohio, will always be my home town.  This is the small town of my writings, this is the place where I learned about trust, family, friendships, and the sorrows that come with life.  So the technicality that I was born in Dallas and now live in Miami and that other people now live in that big house doesn’t change my answer when people ask me what’s my home town.

This is not goodbye.  I will be back in August for the annual Stratford pilgrimage.  But I can’t miss one last spring in Perrysburg: they do it like no one else.

Sunday, March 31, 2013

Happy Easter

Happy Easter from my family, back in the time when we celebrated it.  If you celebrate, have a happy day.

Easter 1959

Easter 1959

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Happy Birthday, Phil and Steve

My father and his twin were born on August 28, 1926. Here’s my birthday card for both of them.

1932

1952

2006

Sailing.
Digging.
Hunting.
Shard-picking.
Swallows and Amazons.
The Wind in the Willows.
Animal jokes.
Lake Harriet.
The cuckoo clock.
Red or green?
red/green.
Boston.
The Cape.
Minneapolis.
Bandelier.
Lake Charlevoix.
“Find the bottom.”
Postscript.
The Navy.
Princeton.
Yale.
Michigan.
Harvard.
O-I.
Four kids.
Two sons.
My life.

A scene from the stage version of one of their favorite books.


Happy birthday, twins, and many, many more. I love you.

Happy Birthday, Phil and Steve

My father and his twin were born on August 28, 1926. Here’s my birthday card for both of them.

1932

1952

2006

Sailing.
Digging.
Hunting.
Shard-picking.
Swallows and Amazons.
The Wind in the Willows.
Animal jokes.
Lake Harriet.
The cuckoo clock.
Red or green?
red/green.
Boston.
The Cape.
Minneapolis.
Bandelier.
Lake Charlevoix.
“Find the bottom.”
Postscript.
The Navy.
Princeton.
Yale.
Michigan.
Harvard.
O-I.
Four kids.
Two sons.
My life.

A scene from the stage version of one of their favorite books.


Happy birthday, twins, and many, many more. I love you.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Excused Absence

For you regular readers and commenters who are wondering why Faithful Correspondent has been silent this week, it’s nothing sinister; her wireless router fizzled out last Saturday and Geek Squad won’t get there to fix it until today.

Thanks for asking, though.

Excused Absence

For you regular readers and commenters who are wondering why Faithful Correspondent has been silent this week, it’s nothing sinister; her wireless router fizzled out last Saturday and Geek Squad won’t get there to fix it until today.

Thanks for asking, though.

Saturday, December 31, 2011

Looking Back/Looking Forward

It’s time for my annual crystal ball gazing and retrospective. A year ago I made some predictions, so let’s see how I did.

On December 31, 2010, I wrote:

- If you thought 2010 was the year of gridlock, Hell No You Can’t, and strange pronouncements from political characters and punditry, that was only the curtain raiser. With the House in the hands of the far-right and the Tea Party unmoved and unimpressed with reality, we’re going to be constantly entertained, horrified, disgusted, and gob-smacked. Speaker of the House John Boehner will be dealing with a group of people who resemble a classroom full of sugared-up eight-year-olds. All the attempts to repeal every bill passed by a Democratic president since 1960 will energize the base only to have them ground to a fine powder and blown away by the Senate or a veto pen. There will be heroic, if not Pyrrhic, attempts to cut spending and bring down the deficit, but the crazies are driving the bus and as long as they do, it’s going to look more like a pie fight than civil discourse. The DREAM Act will not pass; Republicans need someone to beat up on, and immigrants, like Muslims, are easy pickings since they know that they’ll never vote for the GOP. Meanwhile, they’ll keep up the kinderspiel of doing things like reading the Constitution while constantly trying to subvert it and re-write it, especially when they get to the part about “equal rights under the law.” Of course they believe in that… as long as you’re white, straight, and Christian. There will be hundreds of subpoenas issued by House committees to investigate everything in the Obama White House, up to and including the bidding process for the swing set built for the Obama children. If you want to make a fortune in this economy, graduate law school in January, pass the bar exam, and move to Washington.

Nailed it. That was kind of an easy one, because if there’s one thing that’s easy to predict, it’s the behavior of the Republicans. They dug in their heels on simple things like passing bills to support the responders to September 11, 2001 and autism research just because the president supported them, while out at the state level, newly-elected governors took their elections as mandates to enact new bills that overreached and angered even their own supporters. It was a year of hostage-taking and childish tantrums, hypocrisy and schadenfreude, race-baiting, women-hating, and gay-bashing, and we haven’t even gotten past the candidates who are running for the GOP nomination.

More below the fold.


- The economy will continue to improve, albeit slowly. That’s how they do it; they go in cycles, and especially after this last Great Recession, there will be a lot of changes, just as there was after every economic downturn. A year from now the unemployment number will be around 8%, which is still high, but on the track to be lower by the time the 2012 election comes around.

I give myself a B on that one. The unemployment rate is allegedly at 8.6% nationally, but it’s still in the teens for black men, and it’s still higher than that in some states. Here in Florida it’s getting a little better in spite of Gov. Rick Scott’s gutting of many programs and throwing a lot of state workers out of jobs.

- Of course Sarah Palin will announce she’s running for president. We’ve known that since the day after the 2008 election. Her competition will include Mitt Romney, Mike Huckabee, Newt Gingrich, and just for the fun of it, John Bolton. A year from now, we’ll be weeks away from the Iowa caucuses. President Obama will not have a serious primary challenger. The “professional left” is a pale shadow of a threat compared to the hard-core on the right; when they form a circular firing squad, they usually end up winging it.

Half right on that in that Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich would be in the running, but I should have known that Sarah Palin had neither the attention span or the maturity to make a valid attempt to run for office. But I was pleasantly surprised to see that her replacements — Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, and Herman Cain — would be just as entertaining.

- We’re going to see more progress on gay equality, but at about the same pace as this year. Court cases challenging the Defense of Marriage Act will make it to the federal level, and Perry vs. Schwarzenegger will be appealed to the Supreme Court no matter the outcome of the current appeal, and it should land on the steps in Washington in time for the 2012 term. By then, perhaps, Antonin Scalia will be retired and living in Sicily. Based on the make-up of the House and Senate, you can forget about passing the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA).

I give myself an A- on that; the Prop 8 case hasn’t made it to the U.S. Supreme Court yet, but a lot more progress is being made, including the Senate voting out a bill to repeal DOMA. The end of DADT in September was a huge achievement.

- Florida politics will be fun to watch. Gov. Rick Scott will get a lot of stuff through the legislature since they’re all Republicans, but it will be interesting to see what he does with the economy since it’s the only thing bigger than his personal wealth. At some point even he and the legislature will figure out that cutting taxes and services will hit the wall, and even Republicans send their kids to public schools and take prescription medicines. I give it until June before some kind of scandal about cronyism and questionable dealings hits the state; it’s in their DNA. And in Miami-Dade politics, it would be an event if there wasn’t a scandal, threats of recalls, and some people doing the Miranda macarena.

That Rick Scott isn’t under indictment isn’t a surprise, but neither is his approval level, which is about the same as that of the ebola virus. His regime of voter registration laws and drug testing for welfare benefits are facing lawsuits, and his slashing of education funding in favor of corporate tax relief and charter schools has decimated public education to the point that he’s rapidly trying to recover. Locally, Miami went through a recall and run-off election for the county mayor, and the cronyism at the high levels got so rampant that even the Miami Herald wrote about it. In other words, just another year in South Florida.

- Another perennial favorite: This will be the year that Cuba will see some big changes, through the passing of one or more of the Castro brothers and the de facto relaxation of the U.S. embargo to the point that by next year, Cuba will be like Vietnam; nominally Communist but practically capitalist. (I’ve been saying that privately since 1989, though.)

Right prediction, wrong region: what I wanted for Cuba landed in the Middle East, so we got rid of dictators in Tunis, Libya, Egypt, and we’re working on Syria and Yemen. Next year in Havana….

- Personal predictions… the same, I hope, as last year: I will keep writing, I will continue to go to Inge and to Stratford, I’ll still be driving the Mustang, the Pontiac will still be in the garage. If I upgrade my technology, it will be to get a Samsung 42″ flat screen HDTV, assuming I can come up with the money for it.

I am nothing if not predictable. All came true, with the exception that the HDTV is 32″.

Okay, now I’ll boldly go into 2012.

- Barack Obama will narrowly win re-election against Mitt Romney. It will be a campaign of fear, loathing, excess, and outrage… and that’s just on the GOP side until the inevitable coronation of Mr. Romney. The amount of money to be spent on both sides will be enough to run several mid-sized countries. Re-election campaigns are, of course, a vote on the performance of the incumbent, and Mr. Obama will have to defend his record, but the Republicans have, by their own actions, inactions, and lurch to the right in response to their hatred of all things Obama, made the choice in the election pretty clear. The stated GOP agenda has been to deny Barack Obama a second term, but other than that, they have offered nothing of substance if they win the election. That’s not surprising; they never do. They live on bumper sticker slogans and ten-word answers — Repeal Obamacare; Ban Abortion; Deport the Brown People; No More Taxes; Kill the Queers — but they offer no solutions, unless you want to go back to revive the bold and new ideas from the administration of William McKinley. The campaign will resemble that of the one in 1948 where Harry Truman, coming back from dismal approval ratings, beat the patrician and automatonic Thomas E. Dewey. Mr. Truman ran against an intransigent and right-wing-whacky Republican Congress, and Mr. Obama has pretty much the same situation. It won’t be a landslide, but unless there’s a complete meltdown of the Obama campaign juggernaut, he’ll win and might even win back Congress for the Democrats. It will not be the end of the right-wingers by any means; if anything, the re-election of Barack Obama will drive them even further over the cliff, and we will find out that the level of lunacy is infinite.

- The Supreme Court, by a vote of 5 to 4, will uphold the new healthcare law, and the California Prop 8 case will get on their docket for 2013.

- Despite the best efforts of the Republicans, the economy will continue to improve, but at about the same pace as it currently is, meaning that by Election Day the unemployment rate will be around 8%. Consumer confidence will continue to grow, and while the housing market will still be soft, bigger ticket items like cars and appliances will start to sell; those old cars can’t run forever.

- Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker will be recalled, which will send a shiver through right-wing governors from Ohio and Michigan to Florida. As the thousands of people in the streets from Madison to Wall Street proved, you mess with the middle class at your peril, and that sleeping giant has been awakened.

- Here in Florida, Sen. Bill Nelson (D) will win another term in a tight race against Rep. Connie Mack (R), and Rep. Allen West (R) will be tossed out on his ass by the good people of Broward County. Alan Grayson (D), who lost in 2010, will win back a seat in Congress, and this will send a strong message to the Florida Democrats that if they can find some good people to run for office, they can beat Rick Scott in 2014.

- The Tigers will go all the way this year. They got very close this year, and there’s always next year.

- We will lose the requisite number of celebrities and friends as life goes on. As I always say, it’s important to cherish them while they are with us.

- Personally, some things never change. I’ll go to the William Inge Festival in April — my 21st time — where we’ll honor David Henry Hwang. I’ll go to Stratford in July with my parents, and I’ll go back to work on Tuesday. I’ve done some tinkering with the Pontiac as it verges on becoming a certified antique, which happens when the 2013 models go on sale. I have no plans to move or change jobs, and the only momentous thing that will happen is that I turn 60 in September. Big whoop.

- And of course, the usual prediction: One year from now I’ll write a post just like this one, look back at this one, and think, “Gee, that was dumb.” Or not.

Sunday, November 6, 2011

Family Tree

My aunt has been doing a bit of genealogical research on our family, and it turns out that one of my ancestors on my mother’s side was Samuel Levis, a Quaker who came from Leicestershire to Pennsylvania in the 1684 and settled in Chester County. No word on whether or not Samuel considered himself an exile or an immigrant, but it seems that I came to my Quakerism genetically.

Not only that, but The Complete Peerage can trace his lineage back — legitimately — to King Edward III of England.

King Edward III
1312-1377
“Grandpa Ed”

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Staying Here

Marriage equality is the big headline issue, but there are other things that mean a great deal to the LGBT community that don’t get a lot of attention, and they are just as important in the lives of people and their families. Such as…

In a decision that could have far-reaching effects on immigration cases involving same-sex couples, federal officials have canceled the deportation of a Venezuelan man in New Jersey who is married to an American man, the couple’s lawyer said Wednesday.

The announcement comes as immigration officials put into effect new, more flexible guidelines governing the deferral and cancellation of deportations, particularly for immigrants with no serious criminal records.

Immigration lawyers and gay rights advocates said the decision represented a significant shift in policy and could open the door to the cancellation of deportations for other immigrants in same-sex marriages.

“This action shows that the government has not only the power but the inclination to do the right thing when it comes to protecting certain vulnerable populations from deportation,” said the couple’s lawyer, Lavi Soloway.

The case has been closely watched across the country by lawyers and advocates who viewed it as a test of the federal government’s position on the Defense of Marriage Act, a federal law that bars the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages.

I’d be fascinated to hear from Newt Gingrich how keeping couples together destroys traditional family values.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Cousin Fred

Alfred Kahn, who was the man who oversaw the deregulation of the airlines in the 1970′s and served as an adviser to President Jimmy Carter, died earlier this week at his home in Ithaca, New York. He was 93.

He was also family; his wife, Mary, who survives him, is my father’s cousin. In April 1979, I used that connection to get an interview with Fred, as he was known, when I was invited to the White House on one of those out-of-town news director jaunts that the Carter administration did. I spent the morning in briefings in the Old Executive Office Building, then at lunch I was escorted up to his office where I was introduced to him for the first time.

He greeted me as if he’d known me all my life. He asked about my father and our family and related stories about other family members, including my grandparents and my Aunt Emily, who was the family’s most outspoken liberal (at the time). Me, the eager and awed news director from a tiny station in northern lower Michigan, got out my Realistic cassette deck and taped an interview with the Carter administration’s leading advocate for deregulation and inflation fighting, asking tame questions and getting energetic responses. In no time, it seemed, I had run out of questions, and turned off the tape recorder. That’s when he started to ask me about how life was in the rural parts of Michigan, where the economic downturn and inflation were really hitting. I told him that we were hanging on, and I remember him shaking his head and saying that just hanging on wasn’t good enough.

We then turned the conversation to my studies in theatre. He was pleased to learn that I had a degree in playwriting and asked if I’d written anything he’d heard of. He also told me of his love of Gilbert and Sullivan and that he’d appeared in several productions. I confessed that 19th century British comic operetta was not something I knew a lot about, and he teased me about that: how could someone with an advanced degree in theatre not be able to recite all the words to “I am the very model of a modern major general”?

Alfred Kahn may be remembered by a lot of people as the man who changed the airline industry for good or for ill; to this day there are those who believe that deregulation was a ticket to corporate excess and a detriment to the traveling public, and those who saw it was an example of free enterprise long overdue, like the breakup of the phone company. But he was also a man who cared deeply about getting the nation back on its feet at a tough time, and a warm and generous family man. I hold him and his family in my thoughts.

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Summer Memories

Ten years ago I went to visit my nephew at the summer camp in Colorado where I had spent ten summers — 1976-1986 — as a counselor and one summer — 1964 — as a camper. When I was there I took these pictures.

The Mummy Range, Rocky Mountain National Park

Longs Peak – 14,257 ft. I’ve climbed it twice.

The camp is an old family tradition. My mom went there when she was a girl, my bother and I went there, riding out west on the Denver Zephyr train from Chicago, and lots of cousins, nieces, and nephews also shared the magic of the mountains. I’m putting up these pictures in honor of the campers and staff at the camp who made such a powerful difference in my life and wish them the best the end of First Term and lots of fun plus in the mountains as Second Term starts, and also to share memories with my former campers and fellow counselors who are still in my life.

May the Code be with you!

Wednesday, June 16, 2010