Friday, April 28, 2017

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Short Takes

Trump backs away from wall funding.

White House refuses to turn over Flynn documents.

Court blocks sanctuary cities crackdown.

Trump blames Canada for soft wood trade tiff.

Chinese court sentences U.S. businesswoman accused of spying.

The Tigers walloped the Mariners 19-9.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Monday, April 17, 2017

Short Takes

U.S. “working with China” over North Korea.

Thousands of refugees saved off the Libyan coast.

Turkey’s Erdogan claims victory in referendum; critics cry fraud.

United changes their overbooking policy.

Border wall could leave some Americans in the Mexican side.

The Tigers are off to a respectable start: They’re 8-4 and atop the AL Central.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Short Takes

U.S. blames Assad for chemical attack in Syria; Trump blames Obama.

North Korea launches missile into the sea.

ISIS calls Trump “idiot” in its first message acknowledging him.

New GOP healthcare plan undercuts popular provisions of Obamacare.

Russia to ban Jehovah’s Witnesses as “extremist” group.

The Tigers opened the season by beating the White Sox 6-3.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Try To Remain Calm

Trump says that if China won’t keep North Korea contained, he’ll do it himself.

Trump has declared he would be willing to go it alone to restrain North Korea’s nuclear weapons program should China fail to change the situation, saying if Beijing won’t help solve it, then “we will” alone.

“China will either decide to help us with North Korea or they won’t,” Trump said in an interview published Sunday in the Financial Times. “If they do, that will be very good for China, and if they don’t, it won’t be good for anyone.”

[…]

Asked to clarify if he believed the US could solve the problem without China, Trump said: “totally.”

The only good outcome of that is the faint hope that Kim Jong-un is not as trigger-happy or boastful as Trump.

Or if this is just a negotiating tactic, maybe someone’s been staying up late and watching old movies…

Friday, March 31, 2017

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Getting Down To Business

The investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election is getting serious.

In an hour-long appearance, committee Chair Richard Burr (R-NC) and Vice-Chair Mark Warner (D-VA) framed their probe as one of most ambitious investigative efforts ever taken on by a congressional committee. Burr, a 22-year veteran of Capitol Hill, framed the investigation as “one of the biggest” he’s seen in his tenure in Washington, D.C.

Warner concurred, saying, “When we started this, we saw the scope, what was involved, I said it was the most important thing I have ever taken on in my public life. I believe that more firmly now.”

Their solemn assurances to investigate the full scope of Russia’s involvement, to look into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russian officials, and to produce a truly bipartisan report on their findings offered a stark contrast from the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation, led by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA). The House’s probe came to a standstill this week over Nunes’ overly close relationship with the President, and he and ranking member Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) haven’t appeared together publicly in days.

Those who remember Watergate will remember that it didn’t really get going until the Senate formed the Select Committee headed up by Sen. Sam Ervin (D-NC) with Sen. Howard Baker (R-TN) as the ranking minority member.  And that was when the shit hit the fan for the Nixon administration.

Stock up on popcorn.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Monday, March 27, 2017

Friday, March 24, 2017

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Short Takes

F.B.I. confirms probe into Trump-Russia connection.

Neil Gorsuch goes before Senate committee.

U.S. to ban electronics on certain flights to and from the Middle East.

Stephen Hawking fears he may not be welcome in Trump’s America.

R.I.P David Rockefeller, 101, last grandchild of John D. Rockefeller.

Monday, March 20, 2017

Short Takes

Fighting erupts in Syrian capital.

GOP representative says “no evidence” of of Trump-Russia links.

Democratic representative says there’s “circumstantial evidence” of Trump-Russia links.

North Korea holds “high thrust” missile engine test.

Wildfire near Boulder, Colorado, forces thousands to evacuate.

R.I.P. Jimmy Breslin, 88, columnist and writer.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Short Takes

Snow pummels Northeast.

Dutch vote puts populist support to the test.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson used an e-mail alias when he was head of ExxonMobil.

Female senators fiercely question Marine commandant over nude photos scandal.

Canadian Girl Guides cancel trips to U.S. because of Muslim ban.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Friday, March 10, 2017

South Korea Tosses Its Leader

Via the New York Times:

EOUL, South Korea — A South Korean court removed the president on Friday, a first in the nation’s history, rattling the delicate balance of relationships across Asia at a particularly tense time.

Her removal capped months of turmoil, as hundreds of thousands of South Koreans took to the streets, week after week, to protest a sprawling corruption scandal that shook the top echelons of business and government.

Park Geun-hye, the nation’s first female president and the daughter of the Cold War military dictator Park Chung-hee, had been an icon of the conservative establishment that joined Washington in pressing for a hard line against North Korea’s nuclear provocations.

Now, her downfall is expected to shift South Korean politics to the opposition, whose leaders want more engagement with North Korea and are wary of a major confrontation in the region. They say they will re-examine the country’s joint strategy on North Korea with the United States and defuse tensions with China, which has sounded alarms about the growing American military footprint in Asia.

Ms. Park’s powers were suspended in December after a legislative impeachment vote, though she continued to live in the presidential Blue House, largely alone and hidden from public view, while awaiting the decision by the Constitutional Court. The house had been her childhood home: She first moved in at the age of 9 and left it nearly two decades later after her mother and father were assassinated in separate episodes.

Eight justices of the Constitutional Court unanimously decided to unseat Ms. Park for committing “acts that violated the Constitution and laws” throughout her time in office, Acting Chief Justice Lee Jung-mi said in a ruling that was nationally broadcast.

Anyone taking notes?