Friday, October 6, 2017

One To Beam Up

Via the Independent:

Police say a central Wyoming man they arrested for public intoxication claimed he had travelled back in time to warn of an alien invasion.

Casper police say the man they encountered at 10.30pm on Monday claimed he was from the year 2048.

KTWO-AM in Casper reports that the man told police that he wanted to warn the people of Casper that aliens will arrive next year, and that they should leave as soon as possible. He asked to speak to the president of the town, about 170 miles (270 kilometres) northwest of Cheyenne.

The man told police he was only able to time travel because aliens filled his body with alcohol. He noted that he was supposed to be transported to the year 2018, not this year.

I hate it when that happens.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Saturday, December 3, 2016

Friday, November 4, 2016

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Monday, September 19, 2016

Rated Arr

I feel that it is my obligation to warn you that today is Talk Like A Pirate Day.

PirateyActor Robert Newton, who specialized in portraying pirates, especially Long John Silver in the 1950 Disney film Treasure Island, the 1954 Australian film Long John Silver, and as the title character in the 1952 film Blackbeard, the Pirate,[10] is described as the “patron saint” of Talk Like A Pirate Day.[1] Newton was born in Dorset and educated in Cornwall, and it was his native West Country dialect, which he used in his portrayal of Long John Silver and Blackbeard, that some contend is the origin of the standard “pirate accent”.[11]

The archetypal pirate grunt “Arrr!” (alternatively “Rrrr!” or “Yarrr!”) first appeared in fiction as early as 1934 in the film Treasure Island starring Lionel Barrymore,[11] and was used by a character in the 1940 novel Adam Penfeather, Buccaneer by Jeffrey Farnol.[11] However it was popularized and widely remembered with Robert Newton’s usage in the classic 1950 Disney film Treasure Island. It has been speculated that the rolling “rrr” has been associated with pirates because of the location of major ports in the West Country of England, drawing workers from the surrounding countryside. West Country speech in general, and Cornish speech in particular, may have been a major influence on a generalized British nautical speech.[12][13] This can be seen in the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta The Pirates of Penzance, which is set in Cornwall; although the play did not (originally) use the phrase “arrr”, the pirates used words with a lot of rrr’s such as “Hurrah” and “pour the pirate sherry”.[14]

Sorry, Bob.

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Saturday, May 14, 2016

Saturday, April 16, 2016

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Saturday, March 26, 2016