Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Miami Bids on Democratic Convention 2016

From New Times:

Miami may be the site of the first part of Hillary Clinton’s coronation …or as it’s officially known, the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

After local leaders officially let the DNC know that they would be interested in hosting the shindig, the DNC selected Miami as one of 15 cities that it sent a “request for proposal” late yesterday.

According to CNN, other cities in the running include Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, Columbus (Ohio), Detroit, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Nashville, New York, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, and Salt Lake City.Back in March, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez, Miami Mayor Tomás P. Regalado, Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine and tourism bureau head William D. Talbert II all banded together to send DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz (whose Broward-based district dips into some northern parts of the county) a letter signaling their interest.

Wasserman Schultz told CNN that in addition to logistical concerns, the committee would also take into account a city’s relationship with organized labor and key constituencies.

[...]

Local leaders have indicated that their plan would call to host the convention at the American Airlines Arena.

That’s about five blocks from my office.  Parking will be a nightmare.

The last time there was a national political convention in the Miami area, it was 1972 and it was a two-fer: both Democrats and Republicans held them at the Miami Beach Convention Center.  From them we got McGovern/Eagleton Shriver and Nixon/Angew redux.  Both ended badly.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Vindication

Sometimes the wheels of justice grind slowly and they can be aggravating, but every once in a while, things work out for the best.

This week saw full vindication for attorneys Michael Tein and Guy Lewis as the Florida Bar closed out the complaints with a no probable cause finding and began an investigation into the attorneys for the Miccosukee tribe. The comparison in criminal court is like getting a not guilty and then having the cops arrested for lying. It was a truly remarkable feat of lawyering and one worthy of praise.

So there you have it. A few lessons learned, two lawyers have their reputations restored, and one damn fine job of lawyering. Not bad. Not bad at all.

Full disclosure: Mr. Lewis is my attorney and a good friend.  That doesn’t mean I can’t say that I think he and his partner got screwed royally by some members of the legal community and the press (*cough The Miami Herald cough*).

I never doubted for a minute that he and Michael would be exonerated, but it’s nice to see at least some people acknowledge their vindication.

Saturday, May 25, 2013

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Boring Job

The initial work on building the tunnels to the Port of Miami was completed yesterday when Harriet, the tunnel-boring machine, emerged on Watson Island, back where it started in 2011.

The tunnel project should be completed within a year, which will be a great relief to those of us who have to contend with truck traffic on the streets of downtown Miami as they make their way to and from the port.  And I’m sure the truck drivers will be happy, too.

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Push Polling

The Miami Dolphins want to renovate their football arena, now known as Sunlife Stadium.  (It has been called several different names because it seems that they will sell the naming rights to anybody.)  They want the state and the taxpayers to come up with some of the money, promising that the newly-refurbished venue will attract a lot more tourism and a lot more business.

I haven’t been keeping up with all the machinations to make this happen, but apparently the team owners feel that it’s necessary to poll the residents of Miami-Dade County in order to find out how we feel about it.  I got the second of two such poll calls last night, and it’s clear that they are pushing us voters to back the proposal.

I endured the call, but I think I made it pretty clear to the pollster that I’m not in favor of taxpayers coughing up a part of the cost unless a few things happen:

  • Every citizen of Miami-Dade County gets into a football game for a reduced price since we’re already paying for the fix-up.  Make it a flat $5 for any seat.
  • Make the Dolphins refund some of the money to the county if they have a losing season.
  • Change the name of the stadium back to the original name it had when it was built: Joe Robbie Stadium.  After all, Mr. Robbie built it all by himself without any help from the taxpayers other than them coming to see a game.

Oh, and tell the polling company that not everyone is awake at whatever hour it was that they called.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Short Takes

Grenade attack in Pakistan kills ten.

The first funerals for the Sandy Hook victims were held yesterday.

Pro-gun Democrats are moving towards tighter controls.

Meanwhile, the NRA Facebook and Twitter accounts are virtually blank.

Slight progress is reported on the cliff talks.

Rep. Tim Scott is appointed to fill Jim DeMint’s senate slot.

Gas prices keep falling.

So long — The on-line version of the Miami Herald goes behind a paywall.

Saturday, December 1, 2012

Short Takes

Israel plans new settlements on the West Bank.

Egyptians protest after the vote on the new constitution.

Syria — Airport reopens; internet still down.

Mexico gets a new president today.

Train derailment in New Jersey sickens dozens.

Miami may have to choose boats over football in the Superbowl bid.

Hurricane Season is officially over, so this little Invest doesn’t really exist.

Rabbit, rabbit, rabbit.

Monday, October 8, 2012

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Short Takes

Hezbollah fighters have been killed in Syria.

Two car bombs hit the main square in Aleppo.

U.S. is tracking killers in the attack on the Libya mission.

A U.S. Border Patrol agent was shot and killed in Arizona.

The long-running battle over the future of the Coconut Grove Playhouse may be at hand.

Tropical Update: Nadine still chugs away; Invest 96L is aiming for Europe.

The Tigers lost to K.C.

Saturday, September 15, 2012

Short Takes

Rioting is still going on in the Middle East.

Libya: “President Barack Obama led a solemn tribute on Friday to America’s slain ambassador to Libya and three diplomatic aides as their remains arrived on U.S. soil days after the bloody attack that claimed their lives.”

A judge in Wisconsin has thrown out the union-busting law.

The teachers’ strike in Chicago may be over by Monday.

The birther challenge to President Obama’s name on the ballot in Kansas has been dropped.

A couple in Miami are going to the big house for scamming Medicare to the tune of $45 million.

Tropical Update: Hurricane Nadine may give the Azores a look; Typhoon Sanba is a Category 3 heading for the islands south of Japan and Korea.

The Tigers beat the Indians.

Sunday, September 2, 2012

Sunday Reading

Left Out — Frank Bruni on the GOP exclusion of the LGBTQ community at their Tampa convention.

What the Republicans painstakingly constructed here was meant to look like the biggest of tents. And still they couldn’t spare so much as a sleeping bag’s worth of space for the likes of me.

Women were welcomed. During the prime evening television hours, the convention stage was festooned with them, and when they weren’t at the microphone, they were front and center in men’s remarks. Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney both gushed about their moms in tributes as tactical as they were teary.

Latinos were plentiful and flexed their Spanish — “En América, todo es posible,” said Susana Martinez, the New Mexico governor — despite an “English First” plank in the party’s regressive platform.

And while one preconvention poll suggested that roughly zero percent of African-Americans support Romney, Republicans found several prominent black leaders to testify for him. Condoleezza Rice, the former secretary of state, delivered what will surely be remembered as the convention’s most stirring and substantive remarks, purged of catcalls and devoid of slickly rendered fibs.

But you certainly didn’t see anyone openly gay on the stage in Tampa. More to the point, you didn’t hear mention of gays and lesbians. Scratch that: Mike Huckabee, who has completed a ratings-minded transformation from genial pol to dyspeptic pundit, made a derisive reference to President Obama’s support for same-sex marriage. We were thus allowed a fleeting moment inside the tent, only to be flogged and sent back out into the cold.

It was striking not because a convention or political party should make a list of minority groups and dutifully put a check mark beside each. That’s an often hollow bow to political correctness.

It was striking because the Republicans went so emphatically far, in terms of stagecraft and storytelling, to profess inclusiveness, and because we gays have been in the news rather a lot over the last year or so, as the march toward marriage equality picked up considerable velocity. We’re a part of the conversation. And our exile from it in Tampa contradicted the high-minded “we’re one America” sentiments that pretty much every speaker spouted.

Spare Me — Leonard Pitts, Jr. isn’t impressed with the way either party talks about race.

Lord help us, they’re talking race again.

“They” meaning Republicans and Democrats. Race is a critical, sensitive and sometimes painful issue with relevance to everything from environmental policy to education reform to criminal justice to media to healthcare. To address it requires political courage.

That’s why politicians do not address it. Usually. That changes during the campaign season when a given pol calculates that breaking his customary silence might net some tactical advantage.

Which is how we come to find Newt Gingrich last week on MSNBC piously lamenting how “racist” the network’s Chris Matthews is. The former House speaker displayed this previously unknown sensitivity while defending himself against charges of same.

It seems Matthews had the temerity to suggest that Gingrich, in calling Barack Obama a “food stamp president” during the GOP primary, had engaged in dog-whistle politics designed to rouse racial resentment among white working-class voters. Gingrich was shocked – shocked! – at the notion.

“Why do you assume food stamp refers to black?” he asked. “What kind of racist thinking do you have?”

It is apparently news to Gingrich that politicians sometimes speak in code, that when, for example, Ronald Reagan referenced his made-up “welfare queens” he was really promising white voters he’d make those lazy blacks get up off their behinds and work.

There was a study in the ’90s in which people were asked to envision a drug user, then describe that person. Ninety-five percent envisioned someone black. This, even though only about 15 percent of drug users actually are black. The point being that in the public mind, certain terms — “urban,” “poverty,” “crime” — carry racial weight, often at odds with reality. They are ways of saying “black” without saying “black.”

The idea that Gingrich — a 69-year-old career politician — does not know this, or realize that “food stamp president” is such a term, strains credulity. If he’s really that much of a naif, let us hope no one has told him the truth about the Tooth Fairy. It would break the poor man’s heart.

Where race is concerned, Newt Gingrich is a disingenuous hypocrite. And Joe Biden is just a fool.

Did the vice president really tell a largely black audience two weeks back that if Mitt Romney is elected, the GOP will “put y’all back in chains.” Y’all? Really? A slavery joke?

Lord, have mercy.

Why didn’t Biden just show up with his pants sagging while gnawing a chicken bone? It couldn’t have been any less subtle.

Adios — Francisco Alvarado at Miami New Times on the slow death of Cuban radio in Miami.

Some observers say a move toward more moderate Spanish-language radio would be healthy for a town too long obsessed with the lives of two strong-arm brothers on an island a few hundred miles away.

“On Cuban-American radio, you hear things that happened 50 years ago as if it was happening right now,” says John De Leon, an ACLU attorney and Miami native. “It’s highly nostalgic, but it is not conducive for change and progress in the community.”

But anyone who appreciates Miami’s unique history should feel a sting of regret if the kind of radio broadcast every day at La Poderosa fades to static; this is a format, after all, that El Exilio has used for 53 years to undermine Castro’s revolution and amass political power in South Florida.

These frequencies have hailed alleged terrorists such as Orlando Bosch and Luis Posada Carriles as freedom fighters and condoned bombing cars and offices to defy El Exilio’s enemies. They’ve fomented mob rule against those acquiescing to Fidel Castro, especially during the battle to keep Elián González in Miami. And thanks to pressure from the stations, Miami-Dade politicians have been forced to pander to listeners by banning Cuban musicians and ordering boycotts of Cuban-friendly businesses.

Those days might just be gone for good. “It is not like it used to be in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, when it was overwhelmingly Cuban-American,” former Miami Mayor Joe Carollo says of the stations’ influence. “It doesn’t have the same impact anymore.”

Doonesbury — The Ayes have it.

Jim Morin at the Miami Herald.

Sunday Reading

Left Out — Frank Bruni on the GOP exclusion of the LGBTQ community at their Tampa convention.

What the Republicans painstakingly constructed here was meant to look like the biggest of tents. And still they couldn’t spare so much as a sleeping bag’s worth of space for the likes of me.

Women were welcomed. During the prime evening television hours, the convention stage was festooned with them, and when they weren’t at the microphone, they were front and center in men’s remarks. Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney both gushed about their moms in tributes as tactical as they were teary.

Latinos were plentiful and flexed their Spanish — “En América, todo es posible,” said Susana Martinez, the New Mexico governor — despite an “English First” plank in the party’s regressive platform.

And while one preconvention poll suggested that roughly zero percent of African-Americans support Romney, Republicans found several prominent black leaders to testify for him. Condoleezza Rice, the former secretary of state, delivered what will surely be remembered as the convention’s most stirring and substantive remarks, purged of catcalls and devoid of slickly rendered fibs.

But you certainly didn’t see anyone openly gay on the stage in Tampa. More to the point, you didn’t hear mention of gays and lesbians. Scratch that: Mike Huckabee, who has completed a ratings-minded transformation from genial pol to dyspeptic pundit, made a derisive reference to President Obama’s support for same-sex marriage. We were thus allowed a fleeting moment inside the tent, only to be flogged and sent back out into the cold.

It was striking not because a convention or political party should make a list of minority groups and dutifully put a check mark beside each. That’s an often hollow bow to political correctness.

It was striking because the Republicans went so emphatically far, in terms of stagecraft and storytelling, to profess inclusiveness, and because we gays have been in the news rather a lot over the last year or so, as the march toward marriage equality picked up considerable velocity. We’re a part of the conversation. And our exile from it in Tampa contradicted the high-minded “we’re one America” sentiments that pretty much every speaker spouted.

Spare Me — Leonard Pitts, Jr. isn’t impressed with the way either party talks about race.

Lord help us, they’re talking race again.

“They” meaning Republicans and Democrats. Race is a critical, sensitive and sometimes painful issue with relevance to everything from environmental policy to education reform to criminal justice to media to healthcare. To address it requires political courage.

That’s why politicians do not address it. Usually. That changes during the campaign season when a given pol calculates that breaking his customary silence might net some tactical advantage.

Which is how we come to find Newt Gingrich last week on MSNBC piously lamenting how “racist” the network’s Chris Matthews is. The former House speaker displayed this previously unknown sensitivity while defending himself against charges of same.

It seems Matthews had the temerity to suggest that Gingrich, in calling Barack Obama a “food stamp president” during the GOP primary, had engaged in dog-whistle politics designed to rouse racial resentment among white working-class voters. Gingrich was shocked – shocked! – at the notion.

“Why do you assume food stamp refers to black?” he asked. “What kind of racist thinking do you have?”

It is apparently news to Gingrich that politicians sometimes speak in code, that when, for example, Ronald Reagan referenced his made-up “welfare queens” he was really promising white voters he’d make those lazy blacks get up off their behinds and work.

There was a study in the ’90s in which people were asked to envision a drug user, then describe that person. Ninety-five percent envisioned someone black. This, even though only about 15 percent of drug users actually are black. The point being that in the public mind, certain terms — “urban,” “poverty,” “crime” — carry racial weight, often at odds with reality. They are ways of saying “black” without saying “black.”

The idea that Gingrich — a 69-year-old career politician — does not know this, or realize that “food stamp president” is such a term, strains credulity. If he’s really that much of a naif, let us hope no one has told him the truth about the Tooth Fairy. It would break the poor man’s heart.

Where race is concerned, Newt Gingrich is a disingenuous hypocrite. And Joe Biden is just a fool.

Did the vice president really tell a largely black audience two weeks back that if Mitt Romney is elected, the GOP will “put y’all back in chains.” Y’all? Really? A slavery joke?

Lord, have mercy.

Why didn’t Biden just show up with his pants sagging while gnawing a chicken bone? It couldn’t have been any less subtle.

Adios — Francisco Alvarado at Miami New Times on the slow death of Cuban radio in Miami.

Some observers say a move toward more moderate Spanish-language radio would be healthy for a town too long obsessed with the lives of two strong-arm brothers on an island a few hundred miles away.

“On Cuban-American radio, you hear things that happened 50 years ago as if it was happening right now,” says John De Leon, an ACLU attorney and Miami native. “It’s highly nostalgic, but it is not conducive for change and progress in the community.”

But anyone who appreciates Miami’s unique history should feel a sting of regret if the kind of radio broadcast every day at La Poderosa fades to static; this is a format, after all, that El Exilio has used for 53 years to undermine Castro’s revolution and amass political power in South Florida.

These frequencies have hailed alleged terrorists such as Orlando Bosch and Luis Posada Carriles as freedom fighters and condoned bombing cars and offices to defy El Exilio’s enemies. They’ve fomented mob rule against those acquiescing to Fidel Castro, especially during the battle to keep Elián González in Miami. And thanks to pressure from the stations, Miami-Dade politicians have been forced to pander to listeners by banning Cuban musicians and ordering boycotts of Cuban-friendly businesses.

Those days might just be gone for good. “It is not like it used to be in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, when it was overwhelmingly Cuban-American,” former Miami Mayor Joe Carollo says of the stations’ influence. “It doesn’t have the same impact anymore.”

Doonesbury — The Ayes have it.

Jim Morin at the Miami Herald.

Saturday, July 28, 2012