Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Let’s Play Dodgeball

I caught a few minutes of Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) questioning Neil Gorsuch at his Senate Judiciary Committee hearing yesterday afternoon, including the part where Mr. Franken asked him point-blank where he stood on marriage equality.

Sen. Franken asked Judge Gorsuch how he felt volunteering to help re-elect President George W. Bush knowing that same-sex couples were facing having their relationships attacked as unequal.

“The amendments sent a clear message to lesbian and gay couples that their unions were not equal in the eyes of the law,” Franken said. “How’d you feel about the right to marry being put to the popular vote?”

Dodging, and saying he didn’t remember any involvement in the push to ban marriage, Gorsuch was then asked how he felt about marriage being banned for same-sex couples.

“My personal views? Any revelation of my personal views on this matter would indicate to people how I might rule as a judge – mistakenly, but it might,” Gorsuch insisted.

After reading a statement made by Ken Mehlman, who came out as gay several years ago, Franken asked Gorsuch how his views on marriage have changed since the 2004 election.

“Senator, my personal views, if I were to begin speaking about my personal views on this subject which every American has views on, would send a misleading signal to the American people – ”

“It is settled law,” Franken interjected.”

“It is absolutely settled law,” Gorsuch acknowledged. “There’s ongoing litigation about its application, and its impact, right now, and I cannot begin to share my personal views without suggesting mistakenly – ”

Franken again interjected and moved on.

This whole kabuki of asking a Supreme Court nominee a question like that isn’t to get him or her to come out and actually make a statement.  We all know that they’re going to dodge the questions just as Mr. Gorsuch did.  We saw that from every nominee going all the way back to Sandra Day O’Connor, and it doesn’t matter if it’s a nominee from a Democratic president — assuming they even get a hearing — or a Republican.

So why bother?  Why go through all of this ritual knowing that they will hedge and dodge and then once they’re on the court do exactly what the president who appointed him and the groups that backed him hired him to do?  Once he’s on the court it’s too late; he can’t be fired.  (It should be noted that presidents of both parties have been sandbagged by their own appointees.)

In this case I don’t think it’s aimed at Judge Gorsuch so much as it is at the senators who will vote to confirm his appointment.  I fully expect the Republicans to back him all the way, but I will be interested to hear from any Democrats who vote in favor of him how they can justify their vote after what the Republicans did to Barack Obama and Merrick Garland.  I’d like to see how they dodge that question.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Just Enough Compassion

Frank Rich has a very long piece in the current issue of New York magazine in which he expresses no sympathy for the Trump voters who will inevitably find themselves completely screwed over by the man they voted for and who fell for his bullshit.

There’s no way liberals can counter these voters’ blind faith in a huckster who’s sold them this snake oil. The notion that they can be won over by some sort of new New Deal — “domestic programs that would benefit everyone (like national health insurance),” as Mark Lilla puts it — is wishful thinking. These voters are so adamantly opposed to government programs that in some cases they refuse to accept the fact that aid they already receive comes from Washington — witness the “Keep Government Out of My Medicare!” placards at the early tea-party protests.

Perhaps it’s a smarter idea to just let the GOP own these intractable voters. Liberals looking for a way to empathize with conservatives should endorse the core conservative belief in the importance of personal responsibility. Let Trump’s white working-class base take responsibility for its own votes — or in some cases failure to vote — and live with the election’s consequences. If, as polls tell us, many voters who vilify Obamacare haven’t yet figured out that it’s another name for the Affordable Care Act that’s benefiting them — or if they do know and still want the Trump alternative — then let them reap the consequences for voting against their own interests. That they will sabotage other needy Americans along with them is unavoidable in any case now — at least until voters stage an intervention in an election to come.

The people who elected Trump are all over the age of eighteen.  They may act like children, but they’re adults in the eyes of the law and therefore are responsible for what they’ve brought upon themselves, so they have no one to blame for what’s to come but themselves.  I don’t need to feel any sympathy for their plight when their health insurance becomes unaffordable, when their elderly shut-in parent doesn’t get fed, and their blind rage when the rich get a great big tax cut and use it for the house in Antigua instead of reopening the coal mines.

I’m assuming they’re now a part of this collapse of the support for Trump.  They may even regret their vote now or are at least beginning to wonder if perhaps they got conned.  Well, okay, nice of them to realize that.  But they voted for this racist sexist cowardly bully; let them own that.

In This Corner

Via the Washington Post:

FBI Director James B. Comey acknowledged Monday that his agency is conducting an investigation into possible coordination between the Kremlin and the Trump campaign in a counterintelligence probe that could reach all the way to the White House and may last for months.

The extraordinary disclosure came near the beginning of a sprawling, 5½ -hour public hearing before the House Intelligence Committee in which Comey also said there is “no information” that supports President Trump’s claims that his predecessor ordered surveillance of Trump Tower during the election campaign.

[…]

Remarkably, Trump’s presidential Twitter account continued to fire away throughout the widely watched hearing, live-tweeting comments and assertions that lawmakers then referred to and used to question Comey and National Security Agency Director Michael S. Rogers.

Comey and Rogers both predicted that Russian intelligence agencies will continue to seek to meddle in U.S. political campaigns, because they consider their work in the 2016 presidential race to have been successful.

So the director of the F.B.I. testified before a congressional committee that the nation’s top criminal investigative agency is looking into evidence that Russia manipulated the last presidential election and it was likely they would continue to do so; that Trump was repeating a right-wing nut-job website story about spying that has as much truth to it as the one about Elvis working at a Burger King in Grand Rapids; and meanwhile Trump was still tweeting about all of it and giving the Democrats on that committee fodder for their questions to the director.

At what point does Franz Kafka show up and say “Too weird for me, fellas, I’m outta here”?

Actually, it might be worth it to stick around just to see how he gets out of this one.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

No Sympathy

Set it to music, Pat.

Former Gov. Pat McCrory says the backlash against House Bill 2 is making some employers reluctant to hire him but he’s currently doing consulting and advisory board work.

McCrory has been appearing frequently in interviews with national media outlets to defend the controversial LGBT law, but he hasn’t announced what’s next for his career. In a podcast interview recently with WORLD, an Asheville-based evangelical Christian news website, McCrory talked about his challenges on the job market.

The former Republican governor says HB2 “has impacted me to this day, even after I left office. People are reluctant to hire me, because, ‘oh my gosh, he’s a bigot’ – which is the last thing I am.”

Pro tip: If you have to tell people you’re not a bigot, you probably are.

Helpful Household Appliances

Via USA Today:

The White House is offering yet another wrinkle in its attempt to support President Trump’s allegation — unfounded, so far — that his campaign headquarters in Manhattan was wiretapped by the Obama administration. The latest comes from Trump’s senior counselor Kellyanne Conway.

She says the “surveillance” may be broader than even Trump suggested.

[…]

“What I can say is there are many ways to surveil each other,” Conway said as the Trump presidency marked its 50th day in office during the weekend. “You can surveil someone through their phones, certainly through their television sets — any number of ways.”

Conway went on to say that the monitoring could be done with “microwaves that turn into cameras,” adding: “We know this is a fact of modern life.”

I just asked the microwave where I left my car keys, and my cell phone told me to check in the bedroom.  The dishwasher said I left them on my desk.  The refrigerator was no help at all; it was too busy reading my e-mail.

Monday, March 13, 2017

Prairie Fascist

He’s at it again.

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) has gained notoriety for his often contentious — and, occasionally, almost overtly racist — comments about immigration and the demographics of the United States. On Sunday, in a tweet about the nationalist Dutch politician Geert Wilders, King again appears to have crossed the line.

“Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny,” King wrote. “We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.”

The formulation of “our” civilization being at risk from “somebody else’s babies” is a deliberate suggestion that American civilization is threatened by unnamed “others” — almost certainly a reference to non-Westerners. The idea that national identity and racial identity overlap entirely is the crux of white nationalism; King’s formulation above toes close to that line, if it doesn’t cross. American culture, of course, was formed in part over the past two centuries by the assimilation of immigrants from a broad range of nations — first mostly European but later a broader diaspora. Iowa, the state King represents, remains one of the most homogeneously white in the United States.

Calling Steve King “almost overtly racist” is like saying it gets a little chilly at the South Pole.  This is his regular gig.

You have to wonder if he’s doing this just to represent a particular mind-set in his district (although I can say from my own experience that the people and the part of the country he represents are by and large not at all like him or think this way) or that he’s just a fascist and a racist by his own stunted growth and stupidity.  The reason he’s re-elected time and time again is because of inertia and a lack of competition.

Going Viral

Charles P. Pierce on the level of corruption in the Trump world.

The important part about dealing with epidemics is to deal with them early. Just like the fire department would really rather come into a building when there was smoke coming out of one window instead of when there are flames coming out of every window, because it’s a lot easier to control the fire early on, it’s much easier to control an epidemic early on.

—Dr. Don Francis, AIDS researcher, 2006.

It’s almost as though the entire bureaucratic immune system of the government is reacting to an invading virus. The worst thing any of us can do is assume that the ascent of El Caudillo del Mar-A-Lago was not the sui generis event that it clearly was, and that he, himself, is not the sui generis occupant of the White House that he clearly is, and that he has not surrounded himself with dubious quacks and hacks that are sui generis in their approach to government as they clearly are.

There is a level of intellectual—and, perhaps, literal—corruption that is unprecedented in the modern history of the presidency and that is a genuine and unique threat to democratic institutions that are the objects of destructive contempt. The man ran on chaos. He won on chaos. And now he’s governing on chaos. The checks and balances and safety valves of the Constitution—the things that, well, constitute—the immune system of this self-governing republic are facing a threat that is as different as it is lethal.

The latest manifestation of this phenomenon is the sudden firing of U.S. Attorneys all over the country—specifically, those appointed by the previous administration. It is true that every president can do what this president did, and that most have. But the people who said all through the campaign that the rules changed with the elevation of Donald Trump cannot say that the rules are back now that he’s president. In addition, what he did on Friday was precipitous in the extreme and so much so that it seems to have been improvised on the spot, and that it might have been prompted by a virulent paranoia at the White House about “deep-state” saboteurs, a feeling encouraged by the hardbar caucus in Congress and pimped heavily by the conservative media auxiliaries.

There has been corruption in the White House before this present administration — the historians will note that one of the unique aspects about the term of Barack Obama is that there wasn’t any — and there will be corruption after this present administration.  (I well remember how after Watergate it was said that now we will be able to spot and excise corruption before it starts.  Ah, good times.)  But what makes this particular administration unique is that corruption, shady deals, tax evasion, lack of transparency, foreign influence peddling and manipulation, and other various crimes and questionable connections is not only acceptable in the eyes of certain elements of the electorate and members of Congress, it is what was needed to “shake things up.”

There are two questions that come to mind.  First, at what point will this house of cards collapse and bring down the central core of the current executive branch and who will be the ones to do it?  Certainly not the enablers in Congress; they are either too afraid of midnight tweets and the riling of the pitchfork-and-torches constituency to do anything but meekly go along, or they are in on it and are finally making something from being in office.  No help there.

The second question is who’s running the joint?  The current administration has left hundreds of federal office positions unfilled.  It may be some aspect of conservative political philosophy to shrink the size of government, but emptying whole offices and leaving statutory and policy positions vacant means that work that keeps the country running is not getting done.  You can’t run a Wal Mart outlet with two shelf-stockers and a cashier, and if this is the way Trump ran his businesses, no wonder he filed for bankruptcy so often.

We have recently been told to accept this situation as the way things will be for the foreseeable future and that we should “settle in” and ride it out.  At some point, though, the level of outright corruption and sand in the gears of the machinery will bring it to a halt, perhaps so slowly that we don’t even notice it as it happens.  Just as the sniffles turn into a cold that becomes pneumonia, this is happening now and by the time you start taking the aspirin and the Cold-Eze, it’s too late.

Friday, March 10, 2017

The Trumpiest In The Land

This piece from Raw Story is creepy.

Maricopa County burnished its reputation as the Trumpiest in America last weekend as hundreds of locals, including heavily armed militiamen, white nationalists and even a few elected officials, gathered to support the 45th president. The ensuing “March for Trump” was as horrifying as it sounds.

“I heard ‘lock her up, lock her up,’ and we still need to pursue that,” announced Arizona Congressman Anthony Kern; a nod to a prominent Trump campaign promise to imprison then-Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

“If you don’t like it here, go to Syria, go to someplace else,” one attendee shouted.

“I don’t want ’em, as a veteran I don’t want ’em, let ’em go back home,” another seconded. “If they’ve got a problem, let Saudi Arabia take care of ’em.”

Some even dared to tell Dan Cohen of the The Real News Network how they’d make America great again now that Trump was in office. And Muslims weren’t the only religious minority unwelcomed.

“If she is Jewish, she should go back to her country,” a 13-year-old Trump supporter said of a protester.

“This is America, we don’t want Sharia Law,” one attendee explained. “Christian country,” he added.

One man insisted that Senator John McCain was a “secret communist.”

“I think there’s a lot there,” he said of Pizzagate, a deranged right-wing conspiracy theory that Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta was running a child prostitution ring out of a Washington, D.C. pizzeria. “Definitely enough to warrant an investigation.”

The day’s proceedings would grow uglier still.

“I just want to let them know that I can’t wait for the liberal genocide to begin,” an Oath Keeper shouted at a small group of protesters.

“That’s the way to make America great again,” he later told Cohen. “Liberals are destroying the country.”

Normal people don’t hold rallies like this when their candidate wins.

At some point these folks are going to find out that Trump isn’t good enough for them and then they’ll want more.

Yes, they’re small in numbers, but it only took one guy with a rented truck and a ton of fertilizer.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

“Hey, We Tried”

The response to the GOP healthcare bill has been roughly the same as having a wet dog at a wedding, and yet the House and Senate leadership is bound and determined to rush it through both chambers by the end of the month without hearings or even conferences.  (Ironic since the Republicans in 2010 complained bitterly that President Obama “rammed ACA down our throats.”)

The short answer, according to Jonathan Chait, is that when the Republicans couldn’t get repeal-and-replace past President Obama, they had all the time in the world to carry on about how terrible it was and how it was destroying America and they could vote fifty-plus times to repeal it and not worry about actually doing anything.  But now that they have the White House and both the House and the Senate, they can do something… but what?  They’ve got various factions within their own party who have very different goals and they’re all attacking the piñata of a bill the House cobbled together that does everything and nothing.

Not only that, if they repeal and replace Obamacare with something that is truly worse — and this new bill seems to embody the worst of every GOP trick in the book, including tax credits and vouchers — it will be their albatross, and the mid-term campaign will be all about the Democrats running against the GOP House that killed — literally — healthcare.

So the solution seems to be to try and shove this terrible bill through and have it fail so they can go out to the voters in 2018 and say, “Hey, we tried, but there were too many special interests and Obamacare holdovers, so you’re just going to have to suffer through with it while we go on and give massive tax breaks to the rich, gut education spending, demonize immigrants, bully the transgender community, and play slap-and-tickle with the Russians.”

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

They Have Had Seven Years

The Republicans have been talking about and voting on repealing and replacing Obamacare for almost seven years now.  They’ve held news conferences and election campaigns to demonize it and then promise to replace it.  Now they’ve come out with their plan, hoping to unite their base and the country and show the world that they can really govern.

Well, to be fair, they did bring a lot of people from all over the political spectrum, but not in the way they hoped.

Republican efforts to revise the Affordable Care Act met with widespread resistance Tuesday from conservatives in and out of Congress, moderates in the Senate and key industry stakeholders, casting doubt on the plan’s chances just one day after House GOP leaders released it.

The most imminent and serious threat to the plan crafted by House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) was the growing backlash from conservative lawmakers and powerful outside groups who argue that the draft is nothing more than “Obamacare Lite,” a disparaging reference to the former president’s signature 2010 domestic achievement.

In short, they have had seven years to come up with something, and this is the best that they could come up with?  It reads like some kid who tried to write a ten-page history paper on the school bus the morning the assignment is due.

The best part is that the right-wingers are in complete revolt against it.  Which means that it’s not going anywhere.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Boundary Issues

Via CBC:

The father of a fallen U.S. army captain who made headlines during the American election campaign for taking on Republican candidate Donald Trump has cancelled a talk he was set to deliver in Toronto after being notified that his travel privileges are under review, organizers say.

Pakistan-born Khizr Khan, who famously offered up his copy of the U.S. Constitution to the billionaire presidential hopeful who vowed to implement a ban on Muslims entering the U.S., was scheduled to speak at a luncheon hosted by Ramsay Inc. on Tuesday.

But on Monday, organizers of the luncheon issued a statement saying that Khan would not be travelling to Toronto.

“Late Sunday evening Khizr Khan, an American citizen for over 30 years, was notified that his travel privileges are being reviewed,” Julia McDowell of Ramsay Inc. said.

The statement goes on to quote Khan, saying he offered his sincere apologies for the cancellation.

“This turn of events is not just of deep concern to me but to all my fellow Americans who cherish our freedom to travel abroad. I have not been given any reason as to why,” the statement quotes Khan as saying.

CBC News reached out to Khan’s law office directly, which said in an email it had no comment.

As upyernoz — someone who knows a lot about immigration law — points out, U.S. citizens aren’t supposed to have “travel privileges” that can be revoked by the government.  Your U.S. citizenship is not subject to the whims of whoever is in charge of the executive branch or the department heads underneath him.

At least that’s the way it’s supposed to work in a democracy.

A Nice Little Trip For Them

Via the New York Times:

Ben Carson’s first full week as secretary of Housing and Urban Development got off to a rough start on Monday after he described African slaves as “immigrants” during his first speech to hundreds of assembled department employees. The remark, which came as part of a 40-minute address on the theme of America as “a land of dreams and opportunity,” was met with swift outrage online.

Mr. Carson turned his attention to slavery after describing photographs of poor immigrants displayed at the Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration. These new arrivals worked long hours, six or seven days a week, with little pay, he said. And before them, there were slaves.

“That’s what America is about, a land of dreams and opportunity,’’ he said. “There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships, worked even longer, even harder for less. But they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great-granddaughters, might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land.”

And in 1941 a lot of Jewish people from Germany went to Poland for a little vacation in the countryside.

Speaking of historical models:

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly on Monday confirmed a Reuters report that he was considering a proposal to separate women and children who cross the U.S. border with Mexico illegally, a policy shift he said was aimed at deterring people from making a dangerous journey.

Kelly was asked in a CNN interview about the proposal, first reported by Reuters on Friday, in which the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) would change U.S. policy and keep parents in custody while putting children in the care of the Health and Human Services Department.

“Yes, I am considering – in order to deter more movement along this terribly dangerous network – I am considering exactly that,” Kelly said.

“We have tremendous experience in dealing with unaccompanied minors,” he said. “They will be well cared for as we deal with their parents.”

Why don’t they just put “Arbeit Macht Frei” over the border crossings and be done with it?

Monday, March 6, 2017

In The Bunker

Reading this account in the Washington Post of what’s going on inside the White House, the West Wing, and out on the golf course in Florida, one really has to wonder how this will manifest itself.

Trump spent the weekend at “the winter White House,” Mar-a-Lago, the secluded Florida castle where he is king. The sun sparkles off the glistening lawn and warms the russet clay Spanish tiles, and the steaks are cooked just how he likes them (well done). His daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner — celebrated as calming influences on the tempestuous president — joined him. But they were helpless to contain his fury.

Trump was mad — steaming, raging mad.

Trump’s young presidency has existed in a perpetual state of chaos. The issue of Russia has distracted from what was meant to be his most triumphant moment: his address last Tuesday to a joint session of Congress. And now his latest unfounded accusation — that Barack Obama tapped Trump’s phones during last fall’s campaign — had been denied by the former president and doubted by both allies and fellow Republicans.

When Trump ran into Christopher Ruddy on the golf course and later at dinner Saturday, he vented to his friend. “This will be investigated,” Ruddy recalled Trump telling him. “It will all come out. I will be proven right.”

“He was pissed,” said Ruddy, the chief executive of Newsmax, a conservative media company. “I haven’t seen him this angry.”

Trump enters week seven of his presidency the same as the six before it: enmeshed in controversy while struggling to make good on his campaign promises. At a time when White House staffers had sought to ride the momentum from Trump’s speech to Congress and begin advancing its agenda on Capitol Hill, the administration finds itself beset yet again by disorder and suspicion.

At the center of the turmoil is an impatient president increasingly frustrated by his administration’s inability to erase the impression that his campaign was engaged with Russia, to stem leaks about both national security matters and internal discord and to implement any signature achievements.

This account of the administration’s tumultuous recent days is based on interviews with 17 top White House officials, members of Congress and friends of the president, many of whom requested anonymity to speak candidly.

Gnawing at Trump, according to one of his advisers, is the comparison between his early track record and that of Obama in 2009, when amid the Great Recession he enacted an economic stimulus bill and other big-ticket items.

[…]

Trouble for Trump continued to spiral over the weekend. Early Saturday, he surprised his staff by firing off four tweets accusing Obama of a “Nixon/Watergate” plot to tap his Trump Tower phones in the run-up to last fall’s election. Trump cited no evidence, and Obama’s spokesman denied any such wiretap was ordered.

That night at Mar-a-Lago, Trump had dinner with Sessions, Bannon, Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly and White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller, among others. They tried to put Trump in a better mood by going over their implementation plans for the travel ban, according to a White House official.

Trump was brighter Sunday morning as he read several newspapers, pleased that his allegations against Obama were the dominant story, the official said.But he found reason to be mad again: Few Republicans were defending him on the Sunday political talk shows. Some Trump advisers and allies were especially disappointed in Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.), who two days earlier had hitched a ride down to Florida with Trump on Air Force One.

Pressed by NBC’s Chuck Todd to explain Trump’s wiretapping claim, Rubio demurred.

“Look, I didn’t make the allegation,” he said. “I’m not the person that went out there and said it.”

This episode is indicative of his entire reason for running for president in the first place: getting revenge against Barack Obama.  Not just for mocking him at the White House Correspondents Dinner in May 2011 (and the night that the SEAL team killed Osama bin Laden) but for everything: being a good politician who defied the odds by winning the presidency as the first African-American, by being cool under withering fire, by laughing off and even mocking the birther accusations that Trump obsessed over, by getting more done against an openly hostile Congress and GOP leadership than he can accomplish with his own party in power, and the tumult around him that will not go away, all brought on by himself.  This has Shakespeare written all over it.

The question is not just what’s the next outrage that will paralyze the West Wing and energize Twitter, but what will he do?  So far his staff has managed to contain him, but he’s also surrounded himself with toadies, sycophants, people who believe the paranoid fantasies of Barack Obama pulling off a Black Ops (pun intended) operation on Trump Tower, and a Republican leadership in Congress that is either afraid of him and his base or don’t know how dangerous he is.  Is there anyone who can restrain him from taking some action that might actually endanger the lives of others?

King Lear had his Fool who could tell truth to power.  Richard Nixon, at the end, had the Republican leadership in Congress who came to him and told him that it was time to resign for the good of the country (and to try to save their own collective asses in the upcoming mid-term election in 1974).  But who is going to step up and tell him that this must all end, not just for the sake of his presidency but for the safety of the country and the world?

Friday, March 3, 2017

He Won’t Go

When you have Richard W. Painter, the former ethics lawyer for the George W. Bush administration — the same people who outed Valerie Plame and the Justice Department’s purge of attorneys who didn’t toe the proper political line — telling the current administration that their Attorney General needs to vacate the premises, well…

No one has any delusions that the Trump administration will actually own up to Mr. Sessions’ lies of omission — and straight-up lies — to the Senate committee that confirmed him, and the Republicans are well-versed enough in IOKIYAR to brush off the facts as we now know them.  We also know that if Eric Holder or Loretta Lynch, the attorneys general under President Obama, had “liked” a comment by a Russian official on Facebook they would have faced years of hearings and banshee-level screeches for their impeachment.  That’s to be expected.  No one has such low standards for their own conduct and such high standards for everyone else as the Republican party.

So while Mr. Painter may have been the only lawyer in the Bush administration with a functioning and calibrated moral compass, I would be very surprised if Mr. Sessions didn’t serve out his term in office and even get awarded some gaudy medal of honor by the GOP for standing up to the accusations of lying and contempt of Congress no matter how truthful they are.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017