Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Short Takes

Pakistan test fires a nuclear capable missile.

Egyptians stage massive protests against Morsi.

Polls show Netanyahu with a big lead in Israel’s election.

President Obama launches his campaign for his solution to the fiscal “cliff.”

Judge orders tobacco companies to tell the world they lied about the dangers of smoking.

Hugo Chavez is going to Cuba for more cancer treatment.

R.I.P. Marvin Miller, union leader in baseball.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Short Takes

Thousands rallied in support of the 14-year-old girl shot in Pakistan by the Taliban.

President Obama has a very big lead among Hispanic voters.

Felix Baumgartner broke the sound barrier in his 24-mile free-fall over New Mexico.  (Yes, the parachute opened.)

Space Shuttle Endeavour made it to its new home in L.A.

R.I.P. Arlen Specter, former senator from Pennsylvania.

Tropical Update: TS Rafael heads out to sea.

The Tigers make it 2-0 against the Yankees in the ALCS.

Monday, September 24, 2012

Short Takes

Libya cracks down on militant groups.

Who, me?  Iran denies hacking into American banks.

Syrian opposition figures meet in Damascus.

The week-old giant panda cub died at the Washington National Zoo.

Apple could be worth $1 trillion within a year.

Obama and Romney are even in Florida according to a poll in the Miami Herald.  But they’re not the only game in town.

Here’s the list of Emmy winners from last night.

Tropical Update: TS Nadine is heading back west.

The Tigers dropped a double-header to the Twins; fall back in the standings.

Sunday, April 15, 2012

The Last Waltz

This is believed to be the last song played by the orchestra on the Titanic before it sank 100 years ago at this moment.


Rest in peace.

The Last Waltz

This is believed to be the last song played by the orchestra on the Titanic before it sank 100 years ago at this moment.


Rest in peace.

Sunday, April 8, 2012

Mike Wallace — 1918-2012

The one reason I used to watch 60 Minutes.

Mike Wallace, the CBS reporter who became one of the nation’s best-known broadcast journalists as an interrogator of the famous and infamous on “60 Minutes,” died on Saturday. He was 93.

On its Web site, CBS said Mr. Wallace died at a care facility in New Canaan, Conn., where he had lived in recent years. Mr. Wallace, who was outfitted with a pacemaker more than 20 years ago, had a long history of cardiac care and underwent triple bypass heart surgery in January 2008.

A reporter with the presence of a performer, Mr. Wallace went head to head with chiefs of state, celebrities and con artists for more than 50 years, living for the moment when “you forget the lights, the cameras, everything else, and you’re really talking to each other,” he said in an interview with The New York Times videotaped in July 2006 and released on his death as part of the online feature “The Last Word.”

Mr. Wallace created enough such moments to become a paragon of television journalism in the heyday of network news. As he grilled his subjects, he said, he walked “a fine line between sadism and intellectual curiosity.”

His success often lay in the questions he hurled, not the answers he received.

“Perjury,” he said, in his staccato style, to President Richard M. Nixon’s right-hand man, John D. Ehrlichman, while interviewing him during the Watergate affair. “Plans to audit tax returns for political retaliation. Theft of psychiatric records. Spying by undercover agents. Conspiracy to obstruct justice. All of this by the law-and-order administration of Richard Nixon.”

Mr. Ehrlichman paused and said, “Is there a question in there somewhere?”

No, Mr. Wallace later conceded. But it was riveting television.

Mike Wallace — 1918-2012

The one reason I used to watch 60 Minutes.

Mike Wallace, the CBS reporter who became one of the nation’s best-known broadcast journalists as an interrogator of the famous and infamous on “60 Minutes,” died on Saturday. He was 93.

On its Web site, CBS said Mr. Wallace died at a care facility in New Canaan, Conn., where he had lived in recent years. Mr. Wallace, who was outfitted with a pacemaker more than 20 years ago, had a long history of cardiac care and underwent triple bypass heart surgery in January 2008.

A reporter with the presence of a performer, Mr. Wallace went head to head with chiefs of state, celebrities and con artists for more than 50 years, living for the moment when “you forget the lights, the cameras, everything else, and you’re really talking to each other,” he said in an interview with The New York Times videotaped in July 2006 and released on his death as part of the online feature “The Last Word.”

Mr. Wallace created enough such moments to become a paragon of television journalism in the heyday of network news. As he grilled his subjects, he said, he walked “a fine line between sadism and intellectual curiosity.”

His success often lay in the questions he hurled, not the answers he received.

“Perjury,” he said, in his staccato style, to President Richard M. Nixon’s right-hand man, John D. Ehrlichman, while interviewing him during the Watergate affair. “Plans to audit tax returns for political retaliation. Theft of psychiatric records. Spying by undercover agents. Conspiracy to obstruct justice. All of this by the law-and-order administration of Richard Nixon.”

Mr. Ehrlichman paused and said, “Is there a question in there somewhere?”

No, Mr. Wallace later conceded. But it was riveting television.

Friday, March 2, 2012

In Passing

There’s been a lot of reaction in the blogosphere about the sudden death yesterday of Andrew Breitbart, who made his name and reputation as an outspoken and combative conservative writer.

I’m sorry for his family, but I wonder if I would like to live the kind of life so that when I died a large number of people who didn’t know me were glad to hear that I was dead.

In Passing

There’s been a lot of reaction in the blogosphere about the sudden death yesterday of Andrew Breitbart, who made his name and reputation as an outspoken and combative conservative writer.

I’m sorry for his family, but I wonder if I would like to live the kind of life so that when I died a large number of people who didn’t know me were glad to hear that I was dead.

Sunday, February 5, 2012

Short Takes

Mitt Romney won the Nevada caucuses; Newt Gingrich vows to stay in.

As expected, Russia and China vetoed the UN resolution on Syria.

Afghanistan — The U.S. plans to shift more to elite units as regular troops withdraw.

Cruise passengers come down with more than just seasickness.

R.I.P Ben Gazzara, 81, actor and the original Brick in Cat On a Hot Tin Roof.

Apparently there is some sort of athletic contest on TV tonight.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Short Takes

Eight NATO troops were killed in Afghanistan.

The New York Times says the White House is considering a faster pull-out from Afghanistan.

NATO air strikes accidentally hit Libyan rebels again.

Wildfires cause the evacuation of Luna, New Mexico.

Playing a round — President Obama and Speaker Boehner beat Vice President Biden and Ohio Gov. Kasich in the fabled “golf summit.”

An Obama impersonator was yanked off the stage at the Republican right-wing convention; they were fine with his racist and anti-gay jokes, but when he went after Michele Bachmann, he got the hook.

Carlos Gimenez has a lead in the polls for Miami-Dade mayor.

R.I.P. Clarence Clemmons, sax player for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band.

The Tigers lost to the Rockies.

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Jerry Bock — 1928-2010

Another light on Broadway goes out.

Jerry Bock, who wrote his first musical in public school and went on to compose the scores for some of Broadway’s most successful shows, including “Fiddler on the Roof,” “Fiorello!” and “She Loves Me,” died on Wednesday in Mount Kisco, N.Y. He was 81 and lived in Manhattan.

Mr. Bock, along with his collaborator, Sheldon Harnick, was one of the honorees at the William Inge Festival in 2007.

Fiddler on the Roof was not the first musical I saw, nor was it the first musical I was in, but it left a deep impression on me when the University of Miami did a production of it in the spring of 1972. But more than anything in the show is the music; to this day I still remember the lyrics and the rhythms that came out of it. Whether or not you’re familiar with the traditions, so to speak, the music touches you in ways that no other can.

I had a small part in the UM production; I played the Russian priest. Tevye was played by Ernie Sabella, who went on to have a long and distinguished career on stage and TV, and the stage manager of the production was George Bock, Jerry’s son. Mr. Bock came down and watched our rehearsals and added a song to our production called “When Messiah Comes.” It was a sardonic piece, placed near the end of the show when [spoiler alert] the village of Anatevka is being emptied of its Jews by Tsarist forces. Some of the men in the town wonder that since they’ve been kicked out of so many places, would Messiah be able to find them when he eventually shows up. The song had been in the original production but dropped during try-outs. We were glad to give it a brief resurrection.

Sunrise, sunset.

Friday, October 29, 2010

Short Takes

Halliburton admits to skipping tests on the cement that was to seal the well in the Gulf.

Vietnam is arresting bloggers in anticipation of a visit by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Nine policemen were killed in an ambush in western Mexico.

It was a fellow Muslim who tipped off the FBI about the suspect in the subway-bombing plot.

Kendrick Meek denies rumors that Bill Clinton told him to quit the Senate race.

R.I.P. James MacArthur, 72, actor and the original “Danno” on the original Hawaii Five-O.

World Series Game 2: The Giants win again, lead 2-0.

Tropical Update: Tropical Storm Shary is no threat to land.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

Short Takes

The boss at the plant in Hungary that released the sludge has been detained by police.

A British hostage in Afghanistan was killed by her own rescuers.

The first human patient is being tested with stem cells.

Plans are to start bringing the Chilean miners out late today.

President Obama stops by the neighborhood.

R.I.P. Joan Sutherland, opera star.

Tropical Update: All of a sudden we have Hurricane Paula.

Monday, September 6, 2010

Short Takes

President Obama looks to $100 billion in tax credits to boost the economy.

North Korean politicians are gathering to possibly rubber-stamp the next dictator-for-life.

School kids were killed in a Pakistan suicide bombing.

Muslim students at UF in Gainesville are afraid the Koran burning at the local Church of I Hate You will spark violence.

R.I.P Mario Rubio, father of Senate candidate Marco Rubio.

Tropical Update: Tropical Storm Hermine has formed in the Gulf and is headed northwest for the Texas-Mexico border.

The Tigers lost 2-1 in K.C.

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Short Takes

Pakistan isn’t getting the aid it needs.

Skip the eggs — A salmonella outbreak leads to a recall.

Reprieve — Nearly 100 teachers in Broward County might get their jobs back.

Former Gov. Rod Blagojevich was found guilty on one of 24 counts.

Sign off — Dr. Laura will end her radio show.

Green Lights for More Red Lights
— Miami-Dade County’s new traffic signal control system is almost ready.

R.I.P. Bobby Thomson, the man who hit the Shot Heard ‘Round the World.

The Tigers lost to the Yankees.

Thursday, August 12, 2010

Short Takes

The UN pleads for help to help the victims of the flooding in Pakistan, which is the worst in memory.

Meanwhile, there’s more mudslide misery for China.

Poll: Everybody’s cranky.

Road to recovery — GM is rumored to be getting ready to make a stock offering.

The housing market in Florida is looking a little weak.

R.I.P. Former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski; David L. Wolper, producer of Roots.

Tropical Update: TD Five is sitting in the Gulf, right near the Deepwater Horizon site.

The Tigers win one to avoid a season sweep by the Rays.

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Short Takes

Primary winners: Sen. Bennett wins the Democratic nomination in Colorado, where he’ll face Ken Buck; Linda McMahon wins the GOP race in Connecticut.

Former Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens and four others were killed in a plane crash Monday.

Russian wildfire smoke could be radioactive.

Shh! South Carolina will take stimulus money after all; just keep quiet about it.

What a relief: The House passes funding for teachers, firefighters, and police officers.

The fishing ban has been lifted in the Florida Gulf

Home repairs in space.

Tropical Update: TD Five is growing in the Gulf and heading right for the clean-up effort from the oil spill.

The Tigers were shut out against the Rays.

Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Short Takes

Pakistan’s flooding woes deepen with more storms coming.

Add to that, a political assassination in Karachi sets off violence.

President Obama reaffirms that the U.S. will withdraw from Iraq on schedule.

Six teens drowned in a Louisiana sinkhole.

Confirmed: The Gulf spill was the worst. So here’s hoping the static kill works.

Stay away: Rep. Barney Frank warned Rep. Maxine Waters to stay away from helping a troubled bank that her husband owned stock in.

R.I.P. Mitch Miller, 99, record producer, conductor, and sing-along star.

Tropical Update: It’s now Tropical Storm Colin, and it looks like it will keep out to sea for a while.