Friday, March 17, 2017

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

These People Vote

Rachel Maddow got hold of some new polling for the GOP primary.

While the findings at the top of the poll are what we’ve come to expect from the Republican field – Donald Trump and Ben Carson securing the top spots – what is more surprising is to find Beltway-favored candidates Chris Christie and Rand Paul floundering at the bottom with barely any support.

The poll also shows the tea party character of the Republican Party, with strong birther views and a dubious grasp of some key facts about President Obama and Senator Ted Cruz.

For instance, when asked if they believe President Obama is a Christian, a Muslim, or “not sure,” Republicans answered 54% Muslim, 14% Christian, 32% Not Sure.  (Spoiler alert: the president is a Christian.)

When asked if President Obama was born in the United States, 29% said he was.  When asked the same about Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), 40% said yes, Sen. Cruz was born in the United States.  In fact, President Obama was born in the United States.  Sen. Cruz was born in Canada.

The question for the candidates then becomes: Why would you want anyone that stupid voting for you?

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Sunrise, Sunset

And some people think we spend too much money on education…

Americans are enthusiastic about the promise of science but lack basic knowledge of it, with one in four unaware that the Earth revolves around the Sun, said a poll out Friday.

The survey included more than 2,200 people in the United States and was conducted by the National Science Foundation.

Nine questions about physical and biological science were on the quiz, and the average score — 6.5 correct — was barely a passing grade.

Just 74 percent of respondents knew that the Earth revolved around the Sun, according to the results released at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Chicago.

Fewer than half (48 percent) knew that human beings evolved from earlier species of animals.

HT to Steve Bates and Nicolaus Copernicus.

Monday, January 27, 2014

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Thursday, February 7, 2013

A Confederacy of Dunces

Sometimes I think I should do just a collection of links to the latest outbursts of stupid without comment, much in the same way I do the Short Takes every morning.  That way you could see what the far side is up to in a short burst and then get on with your day.  Trust me, there’s no shortage of material.

For instance:

BOISE – Coeur d’Alene Sen. John Goedde, chairman of the Idaho Senate’s Education Committee, introduced legislation Tuesday to require every Idaho high school student to read Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” and pass a test on it to graduate from high school.

When Sen. Bob Nonini, R-Coeur d’Alene, asked Goedde why he chose that particular book, Goedde said to laughter, “That book made my son a Republican.”

Teaching high school kids to be greedy bastards?  Isn’t that redundant?

Or this genius:

In a recent interview, [Alabama State] Senator Shadrack McGill, said he wants to introduce a personhood bill that will define life as beginning at conception. This is nothing new — fifteen states introduced personhood bills in the 2012 legislative session alone –but McGill’s interview is instructive because it illustrates just how dangerous and unhinged Forced Birth ideology has become.

First, McGill compares unfertilized eggs to eagle eggs — yes – eagle eggs:

“Did you know you can be charged up to $250,000 for destroying an eagle egg, but you can destroy babies in the womb?”

Um… bald eagles are a protected species because they are on the endangered species list. Humans are not.

He later went on to inform us that there is Hell to pay for abortion:

“Just based on the Scripture alone, the Psalm that talks about God knowing us before he placed us in our mother’s womb, is enough for me to know that that is a life inside of a mother,” said McGill, R-Macedonia.

“So my question concerning aborted babies is, where do they go, heaven or hell? I just want to know what [people’s] perspective is.”

Moving right along….

It’s not that there aren’t enough of these interesting characters out there; the street corners and blog comment threads are full of these whackadoodles.  What I find most disturbing is that these people decided to run for elected office in their state, got people to campaign for them, and actually won.  What does that tell you?

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Annals of Self-Loathing

Via ABLC:

Janis Lane is the president of the Central Mississippi Tea Party, and she believes that women should not be allowed to vote because they are diabolical and emotional.

“Our country might have been better off if it was still just men voting. There is nothing worse than a bunch of mean, hateful women. They are diabolical in how than can skewer a person. I don’t see that in men,” said Lane during an interview with the Jackson Free Press.

I don’t think Ms. Lane knows a whole lot of men.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Seal Team Six Leader Romney

How about this for low-information voters:

According to a Public Policy Polls survey of Ohio voters, 38% of Ohio Republicans say Barack Obama is most responsible for the bin Laden’s death, 15% say Romney, and 47% were unsure. The results were similar in North Carolina, where 29% of Republicans said Obama deserves more credit, versus 15% Romney and 56% unsure.

Seriously?

Monday, September 19, 2011

Consider the Alternative

Bill Keller in yesterday’s New York Times on how the Republicans and President Obama’s ambivalence have left us with some blank spaces.

I can stand a little ambivalence in our leaders, particularly compared with the blinkered certitude of the previous administration. But in politics there are few greater liabilities than a perceived lack of definition.

Against Obama we have a cast of Republicans who talk about the federal government with a contempt that must have Madison and Hamilton spinning in their coffins. The G.O.P. campaign sounds like a contest for the Barry Goldwater Chair in States’ Rights: neuter the Fed; abolish the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Education and a few other departments; turn Medicare and Social Security into individual 401(k) programs; dismantle national health care and revoke consumer protections. Rick Perry, who likes to rouse Texans by claiming the right to secede from the union, sometimes sounds as if he has expanded his view to encompass the secession of all 50 states. Even Mitt Romney — at heart a Republican technocrat (and the only candidate I’ve ever seen give a campaign speech with PowerPoint) — talks as if the main role of the president is to grant waivers from any kind of mandate upon the states. Such is the power of our new, centrifugal populism.

Do they really believe this, or are they just playing to the Ron Paul libertarian niche? Do you really want to find out?

So let’s get real. Yes, Obama could do better. But we could do a lot worse.

There’s another element to this, and that’s the suicidal efforts of a lot of voters to elect someone who is clearly working against their own interests for the purposes of “sending a message.” This came up last week in the special election in New York to fill the seat vacated by Anthony Weiner. People who claimed they were life-long Democrats voted for the the Republican right-winger to tell President Obama they weren’t happy with the economy. That’s like someone shooting themselves in the foot to protest the lousy way their health insurance system works.

The mind, it doth boggle.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Gaming the System

There’s talk in Pennsylvania about changing the way the state counts electoral votes in the presidential election, going from a winner-take-all, which is the way 48 states do it, to a proportional vote based on the outcome by congressional district.

Under the Republican plan, if the GOP presidential nominee carries the GOP-leaning districts but Obama carries the state, the GOP nominee would get 12 electoral votes out of Pennsylvania, but Obama would only get eight—six for winning the blue districts, and two (representing the state’s two senators) for carrying the state. This would have an effect equivalent to flipping a small winner-take-all state—say, Nevada, which has six electoral votes—from blue to red. And Republicans wouldn’t even have to do any extra campaigning or spend any extra advertising dollars to do it.

The Constitution allows states to set up their elections and the choosing of their electors any way they want, so there’s nothing a political party — i.e. the Democrats — can do to stop it. And since Republicans control most of the state legislatures, there’s nothing to stop any state from doing something like this.

Rachel Maddow explains.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy


This, along with coming up with draconian rules for voter registration and photo ID requirements that are clearly aimed at people who tend to vote for Democrats, makes me wonder why it is that Republicans feel as if they have to cheat to win. After all, aren’t they always telling us that the majority of Americans are behind them 100%?

HT to Booman.

Monday, April 25, 2011

These People Vote

Via Pam Spaulding and SFDB, here is a video of South Carolina Republicans speaking their mind at a rally. Dave Weigel at Slate sums it up:

South Carolina Democratic consultant named Tyler Jones took a camera down to the Columbia, S.C. Tea Party rally that Michele Bachmann and Nikki Haley both spoke at.

“I interviewed around 25 people total and probably 75 percent of them said they were supporting Donald Trump,” says Jones, “and just about every single person is a birther. I took two hours of footage and chopped it down to six minutes of mind-blowing stuff.”


My favorite: the person who says the U.S. spends too much money on education.