Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Good Question

George F. Will asks why President Bush didn’t ask Congress for the power he took unilaterally, and notes that it is contrary to the principles of true conservatism.

Modern American conservatism grew in reaction against the New Deal’s creation of the regulatory state, and the enlargement of the executive branch power that such a state entails. The intellectual vigor of conservatism was quickened by reaction against the Great Society and the aggrandizement of the modern presidency by Lyndon Johnson, whose aspiration was to complete the project begun by Franklin Roosevelt.

Because of what Alexander Hamilton praised as “energy in the executive,” which often drives the growth of government, for years many conservatives were advocates of congressional supremacy. There were, they said, reasons why the Founders, having waged a revolutionary war against overbearing executive power, gave the legislative branch pride of place in Article I of the Constitution.

One reason was that Congress’s cumbersomeness, which is a function of its fractiousness, is a virtue because it makes the government slow and difficult to move. But conservatives’ wholesome wariness of presidential power has been a casualty of conservative presidents winning seven of the past 10 elections.

On the assumption that Congress or a court would have been cooperative in September 2001, and that the cooperation could have kept necessary actions clearly lawful without conferring any benefit on the nation’s enemies, the president’s decision to authorize the NSA’s surveillance without the complicity of a court or Congress was a mistake. Perhaps one caused by this administration’s almost metabolic urge to keep Congress unnecessarily distant and hence disgruntled.

In other words, a true conservative should be disturbed that a president would presume widespread powers without the consent of the governed.

Or, to put it more bluntly: You just can’t go around saying Screw Congress; they’re just a bunch of meddlesome whiners who cannot see the clear vision and leadership of our Dear Leader.