Wednesday, December 21, 2005

Putting His Money Where His Mouth Is

At least one person of consequence in the government is willing to take a stand against the violations of the law.

A federal judge has resigned from the court that oversees government surveillance in intelligence cases in protest of President Bush’s secret authorization of a domestic spying program, according to two sources.

U.S. District Judge James Robertson, one of 11 members of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, sent a letter to Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. late Monday notifying him of his resignation without providing an explanation.

Two associates familiar with his decision said yesterday that Robertson privately expressed deep concern that the warrantless surveillance program authorized by the president in 2001 was legally questionable and may have tainted the FISA court’s work.

[…]

Robertson is considered a liberal judge who has often ruled against the Bush administration’s assertions of broad powers in the terrorism fight, most notably in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld . Robertson held in that case that the Pentagon’s military commissions for prosecuting terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, were illegal and stacked against the detainees.

Some FISA judges said they were saddened by the news of Robertson’s resignation and want to hear more about the president’s program.

“I guess that’s a decision he’s made and I respect him,” said Judge George P. Kazen, another FISA judge. “But it’s just too quick for me to say I’ve got it all figured out.”

Of course the righties will dismiss Roberston’s resignation as just the theatrics of a disgruntled liberal. Well, how about it’s the reaction of a man with a conscience and one who doesn’t see everything through the lens of political motives?