Monday, September 22, 2014

Just Like Old Times

Paul Krugman on the GOP blame-the-victim attack on the unemployed.

Last week John Boehner, the speaker of the House, explained to an audience at the American Enterprise Institute what’s holding back employment in America: laziness. People, he said, have “this idea” that “I really don’t have to work. I don’t really want to do this. I think I’d rather just sit around.” Holy 47 percent, Batman!

It’s hardly the first time a prominent conservative has said something along these lines. Ever since a financial crisis plunged us into recession it has been a nonstop refrain on the right that the unemployed aren’t trying hard enough, that they are taking it easy thanks to generous unemployment benefits, which are constantly characterized as “paying people not to work.” And the urge to blame the victims of a depressed economy has proved impervious to logic and evidence.

[…]

Is it race? That’s always a hypothesis worth considering in American politics. It’s true that most of the unemployed are white, and they make up an even larger share of those receiving unemployment benefits. But conservatives may not know this, treating the unemployed as part of a vaguely defined, dark-skinned crowd of “takers.”

My guess, however, is that it’s mainly about the closed information loop of the modern right. In a nation where the Republican base gets what it thinks are facts from Fox News and Rush Limbaugh, where the party’s elite gets what it imagines to be policy analysis from the American Enterprise Institute or the Heritage Foundation, the right lives in its own intellectual universe, aware of neither the reality of unemployment nor what life is like for the jobless. You might think that personal experience — almost everyone has acquaintances or relatives who can’t find work — would still break through, but apparently not.

Whatever the explanation, Mr. Boehner was clearly saying what he and everyone around him really thinks, what they say to each other when they don’t expect others to hear. Some conservatives have been trying to reinvent their image, professing sympathy for the less fortunate. But what their party really believes is that if you’re poor or unemployed, it’s your own fault.

Having just seen Ken Burns’ documentary on the history of the last 100 years in America as seen through the lens of the Roosevelts, it is a stark reminder to hear again the voice of a politician that essentially echoes that of the robber barons of the 1890’s and the 1920’s.  How little things have really changed since then, and even though it took wars and revolutions to try to change them, they still sound like John D. Rockefeller and J.P. Morgan: screw you if you haven’t got a million bucks lying around, and I don’t have to explain a damn thing to anybody.

Footnote:  On a brighter note, the heirs of Rockefeller have decided that they want nothing more to do with the oil business because of its impact on the climate.

One bark on “Just Like Old Times

  1. St. Ronnie took on the “welfare queens”, remember? It’s the meme that always gets the blood pumping. THEY are taking hard earned taxes and smoking it or buying Fritos and beer with the food stamps we generously give them out of our own pockets.

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