Sunday, July 29, 2012

Cage Match: Cheney v. Palin

Former Vice President Dick Cheney told ABC News that picking Sarah Palin as the vice presidential candidate in 2008 was a mistake.

Dick Cheney has some advice for Mitt Romney on choosing a running mate: Don’t pick another Sarah Palin.

In his first interview since receiving a heart transplant in March, Cheney told ABC News, that John McCain’s decision to pick Palin as his running mate in 2008 was “a mistake” — one that it is important from Romney not to repeat.

It’s subject on which Cheney has some unique experience. He helped Presidents Gerald Ford and George W. Bush lead their vice presidential searches and, of course, served as vice president for eight years. He’s also privately offered some advice to both Romney and Beth Myers, who is leading Romney’s search for a runningmate, on the process.

Cheney would not comment on what he told Romney and Myers, but he was harsh in his assessment of McCain’s decision to pick Palin.

“That one,” Cheney said, “I don’t think was well handled.”

“The test to get on that small list has to be, ‘Is this person capable of being president of the United States?’”

Cheney believes Sarah Palin failed that test.

In the larger scope, this pits the two wings of the GOP wingnutosphere against each other: the Bushies vs. the Tea Partiers, and those are the elements that Mitt Romney has to please in his choice of running mate: someone who’s not going to scare off the independents, but someone who’s got enough cred with the birthers and baggers to keep them from going rogue. Good luck with that.

It will be interesting to see what the reaction to Cheney’s remark is from John McCain and Wasilla. I’m willing to bet that somehow they’re going to blame it on Barack Obama: if the Democrats hadn’t chosen that Ni-CLANG!, the McCain campaign wouldn’t have had to go with a game changer. Yeah, that’s the ticket.

Cage Match: Cheney v. Palin

Former Vice President Dick Cheney told ABC News that picking Sarah Palin as the vice presidential candidate in 2008 was a mistake.

Dick Cheney has some advice for Mitt Romney on choosing a running mate: Don’t pick another Sarah Palin.

In his first interview since receiving a heart transplant in March, Cheney told ABC News, that John McCain’s decision to pick Palin as his running mate in 2008 was “a mistake” — one that it is important from Romney not to repeat.

It’s subject on which Cheney has some unique experience. He helped Presidents Gerald Ford and George W. Bush lead their vice presidential searches and, of course, served as vice president for eight years. He’s also privately offered some advice to both Romney and Beth Myers, who is leading Romney’s search for a runningmate, on the process.

Cheney would not comment on what he told Romney and Myers, but he was harsh in his assessment of McCain’s decision to pick Palin.

“That one,” Cheney said, “I don’t think was well handled.”

“The test to get on that small list has to be, ‘Is this person capable of being president of the United States?’”

Cheney believes Sarah Palin failed that test.

In the larger scope, this pits the two wings of the GOP wingnutosphere against each other: the Bushies vs. the Tea Partiers, and those are the elements that Mitt Romney has to please in his choice of running mate: someone who’s not going to scare off the independents, but someone who’s got enough cred with the birthers and baggers to keep them from going rogue. Good luck with that.

It will be interesting to see what the reaction to Cheney’s remark is from John McCain and Wasilla. I’m willing to bet that somehow they’re going to blame it on Barack Obama: if the Democrats hadn’t chosen that Ni-CLANG!, the McCain campaign wouldn’t have had to go with a game changer. Yeah, that’s the ticket.

Saturday, June 4, 2011

Short Takes

NATO steps up its attacks in Libya.

Thousands flee the capital of Yemen after an attack on the president.

John Edwards is indicted on six counts of violating campaign finance laws to cover up his affair.

May’s job report was disappointing.

The ACLU of Florida is suing over the new voter laws.

R.I.P. James Arness, star of Gunsmoke; Dr. Jack Kevorkian, assisted suicide advocate.

Tropical update: There are two areas of disturbed weather out in the Atlantic.

The Tigers lost to the White Sox.

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Short Takes

The U.S. has ordered non-essential diplomats out of Yemen.

John Edwards could be indicted over campaign finance violations.

Jared Loughner, the alleged shooter in Tuscon, is ruled incompetent to stand trial.

Relief groups seek relief after a hard spring of natural disasters.

Foreclosures are still high, slowing the economic recovery.

Miami-Dade teachers and school administration strike a deal for next year.

The Tigers had the night off; they’re bracing for the Red Sox.

Sunday, July 18, 2010

Short Takes

So far so good — no leaks yet from the broken well cap.

Bombings in Iraq killed anti-al-Qaeda group members as they lined up for their paychecks.

According to the New York Times, health insurers are pushing plans that limit choices of doctors.

Florida Democrats do some fund-raising of their own.

Vice President Joe Biden’s presidential campaign owes #219,000 in fines to the FEC.

The Tigers dropped a twin bill to the Indians.

Monday, July 27, 2009

Short Takes

North Korea keeps sending mixed signals.

Secretary of State Clinton has a message for Iran on nukes: don’t.

Sarah Palin quit her job yesterday.

There are many ways to pay for health care.

South Florida employers have two small requests for health care reform: make it cheap and easy.

Honduras’s ousted president’s attempt to return isn’t getting much ground.

R.I.P. Florida State Sen. Jim King.

All’s Fair? — A candidate who lost an election is suing over an attack ad.

The Tigers let Chicago get four runs in the first inning and never recovered, losing 5-1 (on national TV). They’re still in first place in the AL Central.

Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Finally

It’s Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) now, 246 days after the election.

Flanked by Sen. Amy Klobuchar and former Vice President Walter Mondale, Franken received a standing ovation from family members, supporters and others in the public galleries. Vice President Joe Biden offered his congratulations, and a packed Senate gallery that included Franken’s wife, Franni, erupted into hugs and applause.

Best wishes from a former Minnesota resident and son of a native Minnesotan.

Josh Marshall does have one lament; the comedian Al Franken is no more. TPM takes a stroll down memory lane and visits some of the new senator’s lighter moments, including a star turn as Mick Jagger.

Of course the Republicans are still griping about the “stolen” election (see below). I offer them the same advice they gave me in 2000: get over it.

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Minnesota Supreme Court Rules for Al Franken

From MSNBC:

The Minnesota Supreme Court has ordered that Democrat Al Franken be certified as the winner of the state’s long-running Senate race.

Yip yah!

Update from the Minneapolis Star-Tribune:

The Minnesota Supreme Court ruled today that Democrat Al Franken won the U.S. Senate election and said he was entitled to an election certificate that would lead to him being seated in the Senate.

“Affirmed,” wrote the Supreme Court, unanimously rejecting Republican Norm Coleman’s claims that inconsistent practices by local elections officials and wrong decisions by a lower court had denied him victory.

“Al Franken received the highest number of votes legally cast and is entitled [under Minnesota law] to receive the certificate of election as United States Senator from the State of Minnesota,” the court wrote.

In upholding a lower court ruling in April, the justices said Coleman had “not shown that the trial court’s findings of fact are clearly erroneous or that the court committed an error of law or abused its discretion.”

Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Short Takes

Army recruiter shot and killed in Little Rock, Arkansas.

The union lablel — The UAW is now part owner of GM.

No signs of missing Air France plane with 228 aboard.

Increased security is ordered around abortion clinics by the Department of Justice.

Dick Cheney on marriage equality — surprise; he’s in favor of it.

Randall Terry is soulless and hungry for hot wings.

The never-ending story — Coleman v. Franken oral arguments were heard in the Minnesota Supreme Court yesterday.

Tuition hikes at Florida colleges — It just got more expensive to go to school.

Soaked — Record rainfall in May in Florida erased a lot of the drought.

Belay that — Dania Beach school teaches how to repel pirates.

Tigers idle last night; open a stand at home against Boston tonight.

Monday, May 4, 2009

Short Takes

Flu closes two schools in Miami-Dade.

Pakistan nukes — Who’s minding the bombs while the government struggles to stay in place?

The Boston Globe may be the next paper to fold.

Less Stress
— The administration is preparing to say the banks are better off than feared.

John Edwards’s 2008 campaign faces federal probe.

Feds warn of the dangers of flea and tick products for pets.

Tigers win against Cleveland.

Saturday, April 25, 2009

Short Takes

Torture Doesn’t Work — The Washington Post reports that a 2002 military memo called extreme duress “torture” and an unreliable interrogation tool.

Meanwhile, the CIA inspector general noted in 2004 that there was no proof that torture prevented any further attacks.

A Little Late — Judge Jay Bybee tells friends now that he’s sorry he signed off on the memo that narrowed the definition of torture for the Bush administration.

Reconcile This
— President Obama will get the health care bill through on a filibuster-proof budget plan.

Chrysler and Fiat have a tentative deal. GM is rushing to wrap up their deal and rumors swirl about the fate of Pontiac.

Rep. Michele Bachmann
(R-MN) needs to take a good high school earth science class.

Democrat wins special election in New York.

Tigers lose in Kansas City.

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Unappealing

Norm Coleman refuses to let reality dawn in Minnesota.

Ignoring opponents’ demands that he concede, Norm Coleman told the Minnesota Supreme Court Monday that a lower court got it all wrong when it ruled that Al Franken won the 2008 U.S. Senate election.

“The Minnesota tradition in law [is] to enfranchise people, and their decision disenfranchises many Minnesotans whose votes have been wrongly rejected,” said Coleman legal spokesman Ben Ginsberg.

Let’s just hope that when it’s all over, Mr. Coleman does not decide to retire to Florida.

Meanwhile, “Senator-elect” Al Franken is hiring a staff.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Give It Up, Norm

Voters in Minnesota are telling former Sen. Norm Coleman to concede that he lost the election last November.

By a 63%-37% margin, voters say that Coleman should concede the race, rather than continue to appeal. After being reminded by the pollster that Minnesota currently has only one Senator, they say by a 59%-41% margin that Franken should be seated immediately, rather than allow the seat to stay vacant. And by a 59%-41% margin, they say that Republican Gov. Tim Pawlenty should sign a certificate of election.

The people have spoken, both at the polls in November 2008 and now through the judiciary, yet Mr. Coleman persists. He and his supporters say it’s a matter of making sure that every vote counts and it nothing whatsoever to do with the fact that Mr. Franken would represent the 59th Democrat in the Senate and therefore be one more vote for President Obama’s agenda. Oh, no, nothing at all like that.

Yeah, right.

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Short Takes

North Korea is throwing tantrums.

New York might become the next state to consider legislation allowing same-sex marriage.

Pirates try to capture another American ship but are repelled.

Obama explains where we stand on the economy.

The Endless November — Norm Coleman plans to appeal the Minnesota court ruling over the Senate seat that he lost five months ago.

South Florida braces for the tourism impact if travel restrictions to Cuba are lifted.

Mustn’t See TV — Rod Blagojevich to host a reality show?

Tigers rained out.

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Short Takes

Al Franken wins Senate election in Minnesota — But it’s not over yet.

Un Poco — Obama lifts travel and financial restrictions for Cuban-Americans to travel to Cuba. No, the embargo is not over.

Anti-government protests get deadly in Thailand.

The Big Six — Spain plans to indict six former Bush administration officials for sanctioning torture at Guantánamo.

“3 Rounds, 3 Dead Bodies” — How the SEALs ended the ordeal of Captain Phillips.

Cage Match — Jonah Goldberg vs. Rush Limbaugh.

Mark “the Bird” Fidrych, former All-Star pitcher for the Tigers, has died.

Tigers lose to Chisox at Comerica.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Short Takes

Obama in Europe — The president arrives for the G20 and a tour of the continent.

Too Close to Call — A special congressional election in upstate New York to fill the vacant seat left by Sen. Gillibrand has the Democrat, Scott Murphy, ahead by 65 votes. Speaking of which…

Minnesota Senate Saga — Norm Coleman lost a ruling in court; vows to fight on.

Stay Away, Sarah — GOP would rather invite Newt Gingrich to a fundraiser.

Four Days a Week — Broward County schools will shift to a shorter work week this summer to save money.

Check Your Computer — The Conflicker worm is supposed to attack today. (So far, so goo………)

Tigers lose
in the rain, 7-2, to Nationals. Roster surprise: They release Gary Sheffield; one HR shy of 500.

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Short Takes

Tax ‘Em Back — Congress moves to tax the hell out of those A.I.G. bonuses.

Hot Seat — A.I.G. CEO Edward Liddy testifies before Congress today. Stand by for some high-level outrage and posturing from both sides. And finger-pointing…mustn’t forget that.

Former President Bush refuses to criticize President Obama. He leaves that up to Dick Cheney.

Bush v. Gore II — Norm Coleman may use that as precedent if he loses the recount in Minnesota

Natasha Richardson is in serious condition in NY hospital after skiing accident in Quebec.

Rolling On
— Rolls-Royce sales remain steady in spite of the economy.

Tigers Tied — 1 to 1 against the Astros in ten innings. You can do that in spring training. 19 days to go to opening day.

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Short Takes

A Good Week on Wall Street — I wonder if George F. Will will give the president any credit for it.

What’s in a label? — They’re not “enemy combatants” but they’re still held indefinitely and without charge.

Minnesota Saga — The Coleman/Franken case finally goes to the judges.

“Don’t Listen to him; we’ll take it” — South Carolina legislature wants the stimulus money despite the governor’s grandstanding.

Va Cuba gets busy — A lot of people are calling the charter companies that are licensed to travel to Cuba now that the Bush-era rules are being relaxed.

Call the Wahh-mbulance — Jack Kelly of The Blade proves once again that he’s both a craven hypocrite and a thin-skinned whiner.

Tigers Beat: Mets 9, Tigers 3. 23 days and counting…

Saturday Cartoon — Tom Terrific.

Friday, February 27, 2009

Short Takes

Those Crazy Clowns of CPAC — the wingnuts gather in Washington to peddle their fish.

Stealing Their Thunder — Reid and Pelosi oppose assault weapons ban, thus depriving the NRA of their biggest fund-raising tool.

Big Bucks
— President Obama sends his budget to Congress.

August 31, 2010 is the date by which President Obama says we’ll have most of our troops out of Iraq. Of course, it all depends on what the definition of “most” is.

Minnesota Senate — Now Norm Coleman wants a Mulligan.

“Suffer the Little Children…” — “Christian” boot camp outrages.

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Short Takes

Budget Beginnings — The president starts the dance of the dollars.

Banning Primates as Pets — The House passes the Captive Primate Safety Act.

Out of Work — massive layoffs hit South Florida.

More trouble for Norm Coleman after a key witness is excluded from testifying.

The Real Kenneth responds to Bobby Jindal.

Winter is over: Spring training baseball games start and the Tigers win their opener.