Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Welcome Home

When my father and his twin were young boys in Minneapolis, they read the Swallows and Amazons book series written by Arthur Ransome. The books, twelve in all, tell of the adventures of children sailing on the lakes in the north of England and also on the Norfolk Broads. When my grandparents’ house was sold in the early 1960’s, Dad brought the books home, and I read every one of them, cherishing them, and even learning a lot about sailing.

(In 1973, I found the books published in paperback at Fanfare Books in Stratford, and I bought all of them so I would have my own collection.)

In 1982, my parents moved to Michigan, and the books went with them. In 1997, they sold the house and moved back to Perrysburg. In the move, though, the books were left behind. I tried to get in touch with the new owner about getting them back, but I got no response, and I was sure they were gone forever, and along with them the memories that only a book held in the hand can bring. But this summer, the house was sold again, this time to a family friend. Lo and behold, she found eight of the books still on the shelves where they had been left nearly twenty-five years ago. My sister told her friend how much the books meant to me, and she graciously gave them back to us.  When I was in Cincinnati I picked up eight of them, ready to take home and become a part of my cherished collection of books that mean more to me than just the words on the page.  It’s a connection to my father and something that meant very much to him.

Welcome home, Swallows, Amazons, D’s, and Captain Flint.

Friday, September 4, 2020

Friday, August 14, 2020

Happy Friday

Almost half-way through August, I’m remembering how I used to spend a week or so with my parents and go to Stratford, Ontario, for our annual trip to the Shakespeare Festival.  The last time I went with them was in 2013 before they moved to their retirement home in Cincinnati, and that August was the last time I was in my old home town of Perrysburg, Ohio.

Dad’s gone, and even if Mom could travel we couldn’t go because of the current unpleasantness, but the memories of seeing great theatre and having our picnics on the banks of the Avon River are still strong.

My last trip to Stratford was five years ago when my friend The Old Professor and I went on our own pilgrimage because Stratford had been foundational to our love of theatre.

Monday, July 20, 2020

Sam

He died eighteen years ago today. Not a day goes by that I don’t think of him and miss him. There’s still that worn spot on the old bedspread where he slept, and I still make room for him on the bed.

Sam BW 11-26-03

Sam
February 1, 1989 – July 20, 2002

Monday, June 8, 2020

Friday, May 8, 2020

Happy Friday

I’ve been doing some research for my new play, “The Sugar Ridge Rag,” that takes place in northwestern Ohio starting in 1970.  It’s about twin brothers: one enlists in the Army, and the other goes to Canada to avoid the draft.  At one point they mention listening to AM radio and CKLW out of Windsor, Ontario, across the river from Detroit.  At the time it was the powerhouse station for rock and roll, Motown, and just about every other type of Top 40 music.  What Wolfman Jack was to the “American Graffiti” generation, CKLW was to mine.  Because it was AM and the frequency was a clear channel, you could pick up CKLW as far away as Des Moines or Atlanta at night.

I went on YouTube and found an aircheck — basically a sample of the station — and for eight minutes I was back in Perrysburg driving my ’65 Mustang to school, to the mall, to Zachman’s quarry to go swimming, to just riding around with my friends listening to what is arguably some of the best rock music, all over a mono AM signal from a small studio on the outskirts of a town in rural Canada.  Talk about your sense-memory recall.

Time, technology, and Canadian content have taken their toll. CKLW is no longer what it was; stereo sound took away the audience from the AM dial that wanted to hear both channels, and the Canadian broadcasting authority made it so that stations in Canada had to broadcast a certain portion of their programming with Canadian artists. And their audience grew up and grew away, replaced by other tastes and interests. What was then mainstream popular music is now “classic rock” in the same way that a ’65 Mustang is a classic car.  And while there’s still a market for oldies in the radio format, it comes with a monthly fee from a satellite, not a reconditioned modular home in a farm field on the outskirts of town.

Yeah, I’m a boomer, but I’m entitled to miss it.

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Happy Thanksgiving

I’ve been looking back through some of my Thanksgiving posts over the years for some inspiration and perhaps a perspective on the holiday. Taking a day off to express thanks and brace ourselves for the rest of the holidays is a good time to reflect and be grateful for some of the good things we have and the memories. The post below is from Thanksgiving 2007, when I was looking back at a special holiday weekend.

When I was a kid growing up outside of Toledo, we had some relatives in the area, and we also belonged to a local tennis and social club that served as a gathering place for a group of families like ours and we often went there for holiday dinners. It relieved my mom from cooking one of the two big meals at the holidays; if we had Thanksgiving at home, then we went to the club or another relative’s place for Christmas, or vice versa. We also would have the Thanksgiving meal later in the day — usually around the normal dinner time — because we had season tickets to the Detroit Lions football team, and we would go up to Detroit to sit in the freezing cold bleachers to watch the Lions play their traditional Thanksgiving Day game, then come home to the dinner.

It’s been a while since my family has gotten together for Thanksgiving. We’ve all moved on to different places and have our own families. It’s been many years since my entire immediate family — Mom, Dad, and my three siblings and their families — were together for the occasion.

However, there was one Thanksgiving that I’ll never forget: 1967. I was a freshman at St. George’s, the boarding school in Newport, Rhode Island (and also alma mater of Howard Dean and Tucker Carlson). It was my first extended time away from home and I was miserable. My older brother and sister were also away at school; one in New Jersey, the other in Virginia. My parents made arrangements for us all to get together in New York City that weekend, and they booked rooms at the Plaza Hotel. We saw two Broadway musicals — Mame with Angela Lansbury and Henry, Sweet Henry with Don Ameche — and a little musical in Greenwich Village called Now Is The Time For All Good Men…. We went shopping in Greenwich Village, took hansom cab rides in Central Park, had lunch at Toots Shor’s (and got Cab Calloway’s autograph), dinner at Trader Vic’s and Luchow’s, and saw all the sights that a kid from Ohio on his second trip to NYC (the first being the World’s Fair in 1964) could pack into one four-day weekend. Oh, and we had the big Thanksgiving dinner in the Oak Room at the Plaza with all the trimmings. That night we went down to the nightclub below the Plaza and listened to smoky jazz played by a trio and a lovely woman on piano…could it have been Blossom Dearie?

It was a magical weekend. To this day I still remember the sights and sounds and sensations, and the deep sadness that settled back over me as I boarded the chartered bus that took me back to the dank purgatory of that endless winter at school overlooking the grey Atlantic Ocean.

I’ve had a lot of wonderful and memorable Thanksgivings since then at home and with friends, everywhere from Ohio, Michigan, Colorado, New Mexico, Florida, and even one in Jamaica, but that weekend at the Plaza forty years ago will always be special.

*

I’ll be on a holiday schedule until Monday. Posting will be light and variable, but tune in tonight for A Little Night Music Thanksgiving tradition.

Friday, November 1, 2019

Happy Friday

It’s the first of November and the opening of registration for the 100th anniversary celebration of the place where I spent many happy summers among the mountains and wilderness of Rocky Mountain National Park.  The party happens Labor Day weekend 2020, but I’m signing up today.

Friday, October 4, 2019

Happy Friday

The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta starts tomorrow.

When we lived there, our house was about a mile or so from Balloon Fiesta Park. We’d get up on the flat roof of our house and watch the whole thing for hours. My favorite was the Dawn Patrol, when the air was cool and still and the balloons rose like miniature suns in the growing light.  Then again, the evening event when everyone would light their burners and the glow from hundreds of balloons was like a convention of lightning bugs of every color imaginable.

Saturday, September 14, 2019

Saturday, September 7, 2019

A Little Night Music

Today would have been Allen’s 55th birthday.  Thirty-five years ago for his first birthday with me, I bought him a unicorn music box that played this song.  It was our song for as long as we were together, and still is.

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

The Last Time I Saw Pecos

Eighteen years ago today I left Albuquerque to move to Miami. It was me, Sam, the Pontiac, and my philodendron. All the rest was on the moving van. We left at 6:30 p.m., made it to Pecos, Texas, by midnight, and spent the whole next day driving across Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, finally crossing the Florida border after midnight, August 2 (I had vowed I would not stop in either Mississippi or Alabama). We arrived in Miami at the home of Bob and Ken 48 hours after leaving Albuquerque. Sam’s gone, but I still have the Pontiac and the philodendron.

The afternoon of July 31, 2001, was the last time I saw Allen until 2013. It was also the inspiration for my play “Last Exit.”

Saturday, July 20, 2019

Sam

He died seventeen years ago today. Not a day goes by that I don’t think of him and miss him. There’s still that worn spot on the old bedspread where he slept, and I still make room for him on the bed.

Sam BW 11-26-03

Sam
February 1, 1989 – July 20, 2002

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Traveling Companion

Allen and I loved to travel, and we had some of our best memories together when we went to Europe, to Jamaica, to Montserrat, and many road trips when we lived in Michigan and New Mexico. So in that spirit, so to speak, I took Allen along with me to Alaska, knowing that he wouldn’t let a little thing like death interfere with a visit to a place he always wanted to see. And I could hear him say, “You went to Alaska and didn’t take ME?”

So here is proof that he did get to go.

Friday, May 31, 2019

Happy Friday

This is the one Friday of this month and the next where I am going to work: it’s month-end and we’re short-staffed with a lot of other people on vacation.  But that doesn’t mean I can’t put up a nice picture.

This is a view of Grand Traverse Bay in northern Michigan that was part of my summer from about 1959 to 1997. I learned to sail on these waters, made a lot of friends, and enjoyed long twilights and cool evenings.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Happy Anniversary

Thirty-five years ago this handsome young man came up to me at the University of Colorado Gay/Lesbian Alliance Spring Dance and asked if I would dance with him. The tune was “Turning Japanese” by The Vapors. He said his name was Allen. Later, after a bit of a Marx Brothers routine in meeting for coffee at Perkins, we sat and talked, and the next night he came over to my house. He brought me flowers. We were together for the next fifteen years.

Top 40 songs talk about wanting to know what love is. Well, I did after that first date, and I still do, even though we separated amicably in 1999. We shared so many good times and got through a lot of bad ones, and when he died last June 8 it was a loss from which I still feel aftershocks. But I will always be glad that he came into my life, and April 22 will always be our anniversary. And I will always call you sweetheart.

Saturday, April 13, 2019

Me And My Mustangs: Fifty Years And More

Fifty years ago this weekend — April 1969 — my parents and I went over to Brondes Ford in Toledo and found a gray 1965 Mustang 2+2 with a black interior, an AM radio, and a heater.  It had the 289 V-8 with a three-speed manual transmission, no power steering, and no power brakes.  They paid $1,500 for it.  Somewhere in my box of pictures I have one of me standing next to it, but for now this stock photo of one will have to do.

1965 Ford Mustang 2+2

Thus began my fifty-year love affair with the Mustang. In truth, though, I was smitten five years before when they were introduced with great fanfare at the New York Worlds Fair on April 15, 1964.  They took the world by storm, selling over 600,000 in their first model year, and when they introduced the 2+2 in September 1964 to go with the coupe and convertible, they made an impression on this twelve-year-old car-crazy kid: I wanted one.

By April 1969 I’d had my license for all of six months and drove either my mom’s 1967 Ford Country Squire (the seed of my affection for wood-grain-sided wagons) or my dad’s 1965 Ford LTD.  But I’d been bugging my parents for my own car and by April I’d worn them down to the point that even Mom liked the idea of me with a Mustang (although I can’t remember if she ever drove it).  Ostensibly the car was to be shared with my older brother and sister, but they were away at school, so for the first few months it was my car, and when I went off to college in Miami in 1971 (and thanks to an inattentive clerk at registration who didn’t notice that as a freshman I wasn’t supposed to have a car on campus), I took it with me to Miami.

In August 1973, in a fit of stupidity, I sold the Mustang to some kid for $300 and bought an F-150 pick-up.  Meanwhile, Ford kept making changes to the Mustang, including making it bigger and, to me, less attractive, and when they brought out the Pinto-based 1974 Mustang II, the love affair, as they often do, turned to indifference and even derision.  For the next thirty years I stayed away, dallying, as it were, with other cars including a Ford Granada, a Jeep Wagoneer, a Subaru wagon, and finally settling down with the Pontiac in 1989.  But the siren call of the Mustang was still in the back of my mind.  In 2003, when my mom, who had traded her 1979 Volvo for a 1995 Mustang GT convertible, V-8 5-liter Laser Red with white leather interior, sold it to me so she could acquire a Mini Cooper (which she still drives), all was forgiven and I was back in a Mustang.  The Pontiac went into the garage for a well-earned rest after 250,000 miles.

1995 Mustang GT — August 2003 – March 2008

I happily drove it from August 2003 until one fateful afternoon in March 2008 when another driver in Coral Gables tried to test the theory that two molecules can occupy the same space at the same time by making a left turn in front of me. His theory was disproved, and the Mustang was totaled.  I drove the Pontiac for a year, and then in March 2009 I took the insurance payout and, utilizing the internet, found a 2007 Mustang convertible, Wind Veil blue with gray interior and a black top and a V-6 at Maroone Ford in Fort Lauderdale. It had 34,000 miles and a full warranty.

2007 Mustang — March 2009 – present

Ten years later, it’s still with me, 100,000 more miles on the odometer, and likely to be with me for a while.

Like all love affairs, it’s not easy to explain.  After all, it’s just a car; a machine that takes you from one place to another.  But there’s always been a connection between me and this particular brand, and even though there was a long hiatus, I still get that feeling I had fifty years ago on the cold gray April afternoon when I drove my first Mustang off the lot in Toledo and learned, on the way home, how to drive a stick.  What can I say? Love is like that.

By the way, the Pontiac doesn’t mind.  It’s the one that wins the trophies at the car shows.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Sunday Reading

Christmas was Allen’s favorite holiday.  For the fifteen years we were together, he went all out: a tree (had to be artificial because he was allergic to some pines), wreaths, and lights — oh, the lights.  He put them up in the windows, along the mantel, and of course on the tree itself.  He loved the music, too, but not the traditional Mormon Tabernacle Choir stuff; he introduced me to the George Winston / Windham Hill playlist as well as The Roches, much of which is still ingrained in me.  He went all in for Christmas dinner with the family, and when we lived near his parents we were there for days cooking, eating, and sharing, much of it from the German tradition that his family brought to Kansas in the 1800’s and then through the generations.  This WASP/Quaker learned a lot about some sugar-bombed Christmas cookies, cakes, and even liquor (before we sobered up, of course).  He brought that exuberance, that child-like happiness, to my family when we lived in Michigan and would spend the day with my family and sharing our traditions as well.

After we separated we still kept in touch, trading presents and phone calls on the holidays, hearing the nieces and nephews and their kids and grandkids in the background, and it brought a bright light to the quiet celebration that I now go through living alone.

That’s why this first Christmas after Allen’s death has been more reflective than joyful, more a recollection of happier times even when, at the time, we were just getting by, or so it seemed.  But I know that he would be bummed if I spent the day in mourning; “C’mon,” he’d say, “it’ll be fun.”  And it will be.  I’ll spend the day with my friends here with people who are as close to me as family, as joyful as he was, and the rest of my winter break will be doing what he knew was my true calling; writing, listening, and sharing.

Back on Thanksgiving I wrote him a love note about our lives together, finally able to put in words what it meant and how it shaped me and made me who I am.  So here it is.

Allen’s Big Adventure

A Love Note from Philip

Well, Allen, you finally did it.  You’re off on the biggest adventure of all; so big that it’s taken me almost six months to put my thoughts together and write them down.

But life with you has always been an adventure, from the moment we met on that spring evening in April 1984 at the dance at Eldorado Springs outside Boulder and our first date the next night – you had me with the flowers you bought from the street vendor on the way to my house – and for the next fifteen years.  Sometimes it was scary and harsh, but no matter what, we were together, and so many times, whether it was snorkeling on the reef with the barracuda, or skiing the double-black diamond runs at Snowmass, or sailing on the waves of Lake Michigan, or wandering the streets of Paris in December in jeans that didn’t fit because your luggage was lost on the missed flight, or climbing the steps of Notre Dame to pet the gargoyles, or standing in the Vatican to see the pope bless your mom’s rosary, or climbing to the top of St. Peter’s to see the roof of the Sistine Chapel, or the tower of Pisa, or driving through the night from Boulder to Northport to surprise my dad for his birthday, or riding in the bunk of a semi to get to Hays for the family reunion and being swept up in your family’s loving arms and you in mine, or renting the house on Bross Street in Longmont, or the house on Michigan Street in Petoskey, or owning our own home on Canary Lane in Albuquerque and planting a garden in each one of them, or showing up at the gym with Sam cupped in your hands and making him our companion for the rest of his life, or buying me that 1959 Buick for $150, or wandering through the Painted Desert and the canyons of New Mexico, or going to Montserrat and Jamaica and Tobago and wandering the beaches, or standing backstage waiting for our cue to be the boat in “Candide,” or the many, many other things we did, including the weekend in October of 1992 when we went to Traverse City and began our journey together to sobriety.  For every one of those times, you always said, “C’mon, it’ll be fun!”

I look around my house and still see you here.  The chairs and table we bought at Sears for the house in Albuquerque.  The O’Keeffe prints from Santa Fe.  The Gandalf candle in the bookcase.  The fish mobile made of palm fronds from Jamaica that hangs over the sink in the kitchen.  The shirts in the closet that still fit both of us.  The Pontiac in the garage that once had both our names on the title.  Our rings in the little carved box that also holds the slip of paper with your phone number on it.  The dedication in my dissertation to the man who showed that wisdom is not measured by degrees.  The character who shows up in my writing again and again.  The hundreds of pictures, mementos, and kitchen utensils; traces, as the old song goes, of love.

We were never married in the cold and unfeeling eyes of the state or in the thrall of a church, but even if it was unwritten or unvowed, we were married in every other way, and despite the mere fact that we separated for reasons I never truly grasped, we never let go of each other.  You were always going to be a part of me, and when we talked on the phone, each call ended with “I love you,” and “love you too.”  And while we went our separate ways and found new lives in different places and with new friends, our time together was and will always be the best time of my life.

I don’t believe in the superstitions of Heaven and Hell or Life Eternal; those are things the mind has concocted because it is incapable of comprehending its own mortality.  But I do believe in the spirituality of everlasting because as long as I and your family and your friends and the people who knew you remember you, you’re not really gone.  You’re just in the next room, even if it’s just that little pewter urn next to your high school picture.  Your number is still on my phone.  Your letters are still in my drawer.  I can still hear your laugh.

So when you set off on your last adventure that quiet night in the house you grew up in Longmont last June, I knew in my heart that I was losing a part of me in one way, but keeping it with me forever.  Grief does not care about time or distance, and while I may not technically be widowed, I am very sure that what I feel, what I miss, what stops me in mid-sentence, is every bit as real as it gets.  And, to quote you, it sucks.  But it also shows me how much I truly loved you.

I know that you went in peace and on your own terms, and I know that you were ready to go.  Because, as Tinker Bell says in “Peter Pan,” to die is an awfully big adventure.

I will always call you sweetheart.

And Merry Christmas, sweetheart.

Doonesbury — Almost made it.

Saturday, December 22, 2018

Doctor, Doctor

Thirty years ago today I walked across the stage at the Events Center in Boulder and picked up a piece of paper. It was the culmination of six years of work and research, but it was also a record of getting to meet some wonderful people and learn a lot about them, about myself, and about the art and craft that I love. I’m sure there were a lot of people who were amazed that I even got a PhD (my grade school and high school teachers and classmates in particular), and so am I. But having one doesn’t make you smarter; it just goes to show that with hard work and dedication, you can add a little knowledge to the world. And I can also say that I’m a doctor of theatre: I can cure a ham.